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This is a tough question to answer, for two primary reasons: There isn’t a lot of literature on polyamory It’s important to define what “happiness” is (for example, one could define happiness as relationship satisfaction, ease at adjusting, levels of pleasure, etc.) Some of the most current literature (Investigation of Consensually Nonmonogamous ...


9

TL;DR: It's more complicated than the dichotomy "fat=jolly, slim=unhappy" or vice versa. It depends on culture. The report that this newspaper article was based upon is: Patrik K. E. Magnusson, Finn Rasmussen, Debbie A. Lawlor, Per Tynelius and David Gunnell, Association of Body Mass Index with Suicide Mortality: A Prospective Cohort Study of More than One ...


8

The Princeton University conducted a study in 2010 where they found that the happiness from salary tipping point was just under $75 000 a year. The Forbes magazine stated it as such: the sweet spot is somewhere between $50,000 and $75,000. If you make under $50,000, you might be stressed about your financial situation. If you make over $75,000, the ...


8

Yes, as we all know, smiling releases "feel-good" chemicals. The feel good neurotransmitters dopamine, endorphins and serotonin are all released when a smile flashes across your face as well. This not only relaxes your body, but it can lower your heart rate and blood pressure. https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/cutting-edge-leadership/201206/...


6

There seems to be no correlation on an individual level between intelligence and happiness and on the average, cognitive abilities does not lead to more or less happiness per two studies mentioned below. A meta-analysis involving 19 studies by DeNeve & Cooper in 1998 found no correlation between intelligence and happiness. A study by Ruut Veenhoven et....


3

Plenty of well-conceived research has been performed on objective happiness, which has given rise to interesting studies related to your question. These articles support the popular claim that more happiness can be derived from experiential purchases than material purchases: "To Do or to Have? That Is the Question" (Journal of Personality and Social ...


3

To add to Larian LaQuella’s answer, this recent study¹ investigated the impact of the a country’s religiosity on the psychological benefits of being religious. In brief, they used data gathered from an online-dating site and investigated the correlations between social self-esteem or psychological adjustment on the one hand and religiosity on the other hand ...


2

What you're describing sounds like the Easterlin Paradox.: Named for economist and USC Professor Richard Easterlin who discussed the factors contributing to happiness in the 1974 paper "Does Economic Growth Improve the Human Lot? Some Empirical Evidence. Easterlin found that within a given country people with higher incomes are more likely to report being ...


1

Is there a global absolute threshold above which earning more doesn't make you happier? No. Or, more cautiously, if there is such a threshold, it is so high that it can't be detected in the currently available data. Using recent data on a broader array of countries, we establish a clear positive link between average levels of subjective well-being and ...


1

There are a number of studies and peer-reviewed books (e.g. Norris and Inglehart, Sacred and Secular: Religion and Politics Worldwide; Stolt et al, Economic Inequality, Relative Power, and Religiosity) which identify a link between religiosity and material insecurity. If you live in a place where with harsher poverty, or which is more economically unequal, ...


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