Hot answers tagged

85

No, this is false. The University of Arkansas Medical Services debunks this myth: Hair and fingernails may appear longer after death, but not because they are still growing. Instead, a persons fingernails and hair may appear longer because the skin around them has retracted, according to the Dermatology Clinic at UAMS. After death, ...


37

Short answer: No Here is a study from the Journal of Investigative Dermatology: The effect of repeated shaving on human hair growth was studied. Five healthy young white men each shaved one leg weekly for several months and left the other leg as a control. No significant differences in total weight of hair produced in a measured area, or in width or rate ...


16

Yes they do grow back As this video shows. :-) However, if you prefer something a little more informative you can look at the growth rates of various follicles, and the references around that article (it's well known eyebrow follicles are the slowest to grow). It seems likely that surgeons avoid shaving them as they are so slow to grow, rather than ...


10

Evidence: A 2013 study found that hormones produced in response to stress can reduce melanocyte stem cells that determine hair color. A 2013 New York University study published in Nature Magazine claimed a link between long-term ongoing stress and hair color. In that study, the researchers found that hormones produced in response to stress can deplete ...


8

The Death Penalty Information Centre describes the process (which is no longer used in the United States): For execution by the electric chair, the person is usually shaved and strapped to a chair with belts that cross his chest, groin, legs, and arms. A metal skullcap-shaped electrode is attached to the scalp and forehead over a sponge moistened with ...


7

In its essence this is true. Therapeutic doses of coal tar – or Liquor carbonis detergens – are used and effective against overproducing sebum, dandruff and a range of other problems with hair. Its use is of very ancient origin, as the drug of choice it was superseded in many areas but still remains in the first line for treating some disorders. Olansky S: ...


6

I was totally ready to say this is a complete and utter sham, however I have found two papers that seem to indicate that there is some positive effect from using the Hairmax device. A Rutgers team (sponsored by Lexington International) concludes (PDF): This randomized, doubleblind, sham device-controlled, multicentre efficacy trial indicates that the ...


6

As per my comment, this was actually asked in the NY Times Science section. Q. If I tweeze out the single hair that grows from a facial mole, will it cause cancer, as my friend insists? A. “No,” said Dr. Mark D. Kaufmann, a dermatologist in Manhattan. “Even by cutting, you don’t change the behavior of a mole.” Netdoctor (a UK site), also agrees with ...


6

The hair doesn't know, that it's been cut. Means that the hair grows as long as the anagen period allows. It grows continuously before it eventually stops, no matter how often you cut it. The maximum terminal hair length depends on the length of the anagen (period of hair growth) for the individual. Waist-length hair or longer is only possible to ...


6

There are a great many quirky cures spread all over the internet and most of them have no evidence besides a series of bloggers boasting their benefits. In this case however, it seems we might have a slight exception. In 2002, Sharquie K1, Al-Obaidi HK published a piece of research in the Journal of Dermatology called 'Onion juice (Allium cepa L.), a new ...


6

Emily Gibson does have a point. According to this website, the consequences are as follows: Itching Razor burn Nicks Cuts Bumps Blisters/Pimples Genital infections Ingrown hairs Folliculitis: an infection in the hair follicle usually caused by the bacteria Staphylococcus (staph) or a fungus. A common cause of folliculitis is ...


5

tl;dr- Yes, wearing hair such that it's pulled tight can cause hair loss. Wearing loose-fitting hair styles or head wear shouldn't cause as much hair loss; whether or not it causes none at all or just a little is unknown. A good overview of related conditions is provided in "Hair Disorders and Alopecia" (2012) from the Textbook of Clinical Pediatrics, ...


5

There is some evidence that caffeine may stimulate hair growth in general, which could mean that white hair would also grow faster. Androgen-dependent growth inhibition of ex vivo hair follicles from patients suffering from AGA was present in the human hair organ culture model, a constellation which may serve for future studies to screen new substances ...


4

The haircut itself is called the 'Dear leader haircut' and is one of a small number of styles men can choose from. wantchinatimes.com Male university students in North Korea are now required to get the same haircut as their leader Kim Jong-un, it is reported. The state-sanctioned guideline was introduced in the capital Pyongyang about two weeks ago, ...


4

No. There is no evidence to support that garlic has an effect on androgenetic alopecia. The first paper you cite, shows that garlic is effective in synergism with betamethasone valerate in alopecia areata. The present study showed that the use of garlic gel significantly added to the therapeutic efficacy of topical betamethasone valerate in alopecia ...


4

There are many causes of hair loss. As the claims do not clearly specify which one is intended, it isn't clear what to search for. Nonetheless, I have been unable to find any studies of the effects of Castor Oil on androgenetic alopoecia - i.e. male pattern baldness. When it comes to alopecia areata, alopecia totalis and alopecia universalis, I can be more ...


4

"Repeated wash and rinse is required for most people?" – No – no need! Earliest usage or origin? Rumour has it that David Ogilvy invented this "trick" for Proctor & Gamble". But it is unlikely that he invented this strategy, as should be obvious from Edna Kent Forbes' "Beauty Chat" (The Border Cities Star - Aug 8, 1927): Wet the head all over, drip ...


3

I did a quick google search on this one and the first result I got back was this link which explains the history of knox gelatin and when it started being used as a supplement to allegedly increase nail strength which was around the 1950s. Here is the main section that explains why this myth is false and why gelatin doesn't help nails. Nails and Food ...


3

A 510(k) premarket notification must be submitted by device manufacturers to the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) to show a device is just as safe and effective as an existing device (referred to as a "predicate"]. Theradome's 510(k) for their laser helmet used the RF Midwest LLC MEP-90 Hair Growth Stimulation System as a predicate. In Section 5, ...


3

Hair falls from the top of head first because the follicles there are more androgen-sensitive. Within the distribution of hair over the scalp, androgen-sensitive hair follicles are on top and androgen-insensitive follicles are on the sides and back...the androgen-sensitive follicles are transformed into vellus follicles Quoting from Understanding ...


3

Biotin deficiency seems indeed to be rare. As with almost all vitamin supplementation, it's probably better to not take any unless you know you have a specific deficiency. As expected, the sites you provide are full in anecdotal evidence and short on hard evidence, so stick with the Null Hypothesis until proven otherwise. Very much recommended reading on ...


2

There are many types of hair loss (alopecia) with different symptoms and causes and alopecia may lead to permanent hair loss. "Numerous factors may be related to hair loss and range from naturally occurring processes (for example, seasonality, aging) to various biologic dysfunctions, including vitamin and mineral imbalances, endocrine disorders, immunologic ...


2

I know about hair, not fingernails. But what Ian Gallant writes about nails is true of hair, too. Any diet with enough protein to keep you in good health doesn't need supplementation with protein. It's interesting that the maximum length for one's hair is genetic trait, as is thickness, although the latter varies widely in adult men. The degree of curl ...


2

According to common sense, the hair is a dead cell with no nerves. The brain / body couldn't possibly know whether the hair is there or not. Therefore, the body cannot respond to trimming because it can never know it occured. That is unless you pull the root of the hair, which isn't what happens when shaving. So the answer is no, hair growth cannot be ...


2

Separate studies are conducted on men and woman. Long-term treatment with finasteride 1 mg decreases the likelihood of developing further visible hair loss in men with androgenetic alopecia (male pattern hair loss) European Journal of Dermatology, vol. 18, pages 400-20 reports: Finasteride 1 mg treatment led to a 93% decrease relative to placebo in the ...


1

Some phenotypes caused by recessive genes occur in sub-populations that tend to reproduce with other members of the sub-population. For example, Tay-Sachs disease is a recessive genetic disease caused by having two bad alleles of a gene, and mainly occurs in specific sub-populations who reproduce with each other: Tay–Sachs disease (also known as GM2 ...


1

Dogs have some kind of facial recognition according to studies, for example http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10071-013-0713-0 Abstract Faces play an important role in communication and identity recognition in social animals. Domestic dogs often respond to human facial cues, but their face processing is weakly understood. In this study, ...


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