12

Verbatim debunked here: http://urbanlegends.about.com/od/automobiles/a/pumping_gas.htm The physical view: Slow tanking claim and half full tanking claim have the same fallacy: While driving, the fuel/air system in your tank will be thorougly agitated from the vibrations of driving. We can assume the air inside the tank is fully saturated. Vapor pressure ...


10

Remember that all service stations have their storage tanks buried below ground. ... which means they have approximately constant temperature over the day (see table in Georgios Florides and Soteris Kalogirou: Measurements of Ground Temperature at Various Depths). As for the economic loss by due to the vapor: The strategy of tanking half full doesn't ...


9

A good starting point for information about this topic is The Gasoline Wars Chemical & Engineering News, vol. 87, pages 20-21. First, when shell says "nitrogen-enriched", it does not mean that nitrogen itself (such as dinitrogen in air) is added to the gasoline. Instead, it means that an amine detergent compound is added to the gasoline. Secondly, ...


8

This is an experiment which has been conducted many times in different places around the world, with strikingly similar results. The US was probably first, driven both by a desire to reduce lead exposure, but also because lead poisons the catalytic converters which were required to reduce CO and NOx emissions. There are many studies documenting the results ...


8

Yes, tanks of gasoline can explode, given the right conditions. The Quebec town of lac Megantic was recently flattened by a number of huge explosions from derailed cars carrying light crude. (And not big-flamey-Hollywood explosions but kill-hundreds-of-people explosions). One of the reasons given for the explosions was that the "oil was more volatile than ...


5

Gasoline needs to be combined with an oxidizing compound, such as oxygen in air to explode. Gasoline vapors mixed with the correct amount of air will explode. At atmospheric pressure and room temperature (except for a spark), gasoline/air mixtures will explode if the percent by volume gasoline is between 1.2% and 7.1%. See https://www.mathesongas.com/...


4

Does E15 fuel damage cars newer than 2001 that are not certified for E15? The Data Says No. While there's much debate on E15, the actual research into E15 on non-E15 cars appears to fall on the "no risk of damage" side. Much of the anti-E15 side appears to be speculation and anecdote and risk aversion with few actual controlled tests. The Department Of ...


4

At least one source says yes. This is an example for 2014 Hondas: Fewer than 1% off all cars on the road in North America today are true "Flex Fuel" vehicles. [...] Filling your Honda car or motorcycle with E15 ethanol blend gasoline will void the vehicle's factory warranty; while eventually damaging your engine and exhaust system. -"...


2

According to The Gasoline Wars Chemical & Engineering News, vol. 87, pages 20-21, there are differences in the detergent content of gasolines. The 2009 article stated: detergent levels dropped far enough earlier this decade that in 2004, automakers BMW, General Motors, Honda, and Toyota got together to create a standard for gasoline detergents called ...


2

As you note, the flammability limit requires a mix of fuel and oxygen (mostly oxygen) in order to have a fire, and that means that there's only two ways in which this can happen, and neither really fit your scenario: The container actually has to be almost empty so that it's filled with a mixture of a lot of air, and a very small amount of fuel, most of it ...


1

As a starting point, this is what I found in regards to 85 vs. 87 in Colorado: http://www.denverpost.com/2006/10/16/some-knock-states-lower-octane-levels/ Research several years ago from the American Petroleum Institute showed that lower air pressure at higher altitudes allows vehicles to perform as well with 85 octane as they would with 87 at lower ...


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