49

No First, this figure is for petroleum. For coal, the figure is much larger. Some of the figures I found for coal were 133 years, "anywhere from 68 years to a hundreds of years", and 357 years (in that last one, "we" may be referring to just the US). Second, this number is for proven oil reserves. Proven oil reserves is oil that is (1) ...


42

Source Confusion from TechCrunch+ The article by the Energy Consulting Group cites an article by Darrell Etherington at TechCrunch which is not an interview with Musk but instead a badly summarized series of Tweets. The Energy Consulting Group presumes the following (1 000 rockets) x (3 launches per day) x (1 000 tonnes) = 3 000 000 tonnes/day This follows ...


15

For oil, using proven reserves and current oil production, the date is more like 2067. World proven reserves are approximately 1.7 trillion barrels, or 1.7 million-million barrels (EIA figures]). Current rate of production is about 100 million barrels/day, (EIA figures). The 100mb/d rate will eat through the 1.8 trillion barrel reserves in about 47 years. ...


12

Will a Starship launch require 1000 tonnes of LNG? Yes, this is a reasonable estimate. Wikipedia lists 800 tonnes just for the booster, citing an August 2021 interview with Musk. An additional 200 tonnes for the Starship itself doesn't seem unreasonable. Does a fleet require 150 bcfd? Yes, this is a reasonable estimate, if we assume 3,000 launches per day is ...


7

On current trends, we won't run out of fossil fuels, even oil or gas. This is a slightly misleading statement because the question asks about the current burn rate, and this answer rephrases to "current trends", which requires justification. It's a demand side argument; "current burn rate" ignores that demand is (or soon will be) a fast ...


5

While reading the other answers, you might get the impression that fossil fuel availability won't be a problem for 100 years. According to this Nature paper ("Unextractable fossil fuels in a 1.5 °C world"), and based on the IPCC’s Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 °C, most of the available fossil fuels should stay in the ground if we don't ...


4

The article from the tweet you linked claims that both long lines and gas price increases occurred. I would guess either the tweet is a typo or it is click bait to get you to go to the article. https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/10/business/colonial-pipeline-ransomware.html?smtyp=cur&smid=tw-nytimes In the meantime, drivers in Tennessee, Georgia and ...


3

No Comments about the article made me revisit this. The text in the tweet (at least about long lines) did appear in the original New York Times article on May 10. Since the pipeline shutdown, there have been no long lines at gasoline stations https://web.archive.org/web/20210510211833/https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/10/business/colonial-pipeline-ransomware....


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