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True. Says the WHO since March 2020: Children are important drivers of influenza virus transmission in the community. For COVID-19 virus, initial data indicates that children are less affected than adults and that clinical attack rates in the 0-19 age group are low. Further preliminary data from household transmission studies in China suggest that children ...


21

Update 2021-03-24: Based on new data through "End Week" 3/13/2021: the CDC tallied total COVID-19 death toll among children since the beginning of the pandemic (which has now had meaningful cases in the U.S. for almost precisely a year) is up to 273 (76 in 0-4 range, 197 in 5-18 range). By itself, this doesn't meaningfully change the original ...


10

Have the number of cases of influenza been massively reduced? Yes. The World Health Organization track the number of cases of influenza. Their 18 Jan 2021 update covers this. While they warn that the changes in health seeking behaviours mean the numbers should be interpreted with caution, they say: Globally, despite continued or even increased testing for ...


5

If coronavirus has increased, then it logically follows that influenza cannot have decreased, since the same measures reduce both. The question hinges on this assumption. I am not an epidemiologist, and this question probably belongs on a medical forum, but I'll give it a go. Influenza and COVID-19 transmission differ in major ways. How long one is ...


2

It seems it might depend on the age sub-group, at least in France. Although data is so sparse that it comes down to a handful of actual deaths from either disease in adolescents, the number of deaths for Covid-19 beat that for influenza in that group in a statistically significant manner, at least in this comparison, which used the 2018-2019 flu season for ...


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