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125

The graphic is the FY2014 requested discretionary spending, which is only a small part of the total budget as explained in the article President Obama Proposes 2014 Budget. This article specifically contains and explains the exact pie chart in the OP. Contrary to the text below the pie chart, the food stamp program is not part of discretionary spending, it ...


68

First off, Republicans don't actually blame the government deficit on SNAP (food stamps.) That aside, no, the representation of U.S. government expenditures in the pie chart in question is not even remotely accurate. As DavePhD accurately pointed out in his answer, the chart only shows what is termed "discretionary spending" in the federal budget, which ...


67

Follow the citations TL;DR: Politifact ruled the claim False. Politifact found that Deborah Friedell was quoting Michael Antonio (who wrote Never Enough: Donald Trump and the Pursuit of Success) who was misquoting the National Journal. He sort of pushed the two quotes together, taking the parts that sounded best from both. Or look at the source The ...


66

Politifact has determined it to be false, noting that this chart shows only discretionary spending: If we look at all of federal spending, the picture changes: The "military" share, including spending on homeland security, shrinks from 57 percent to 16 percent. The "health" share zooms from 5 percent to 26 percent, once expenditures on ...


61

This is not the case. All charities in the United Kingdom (excluding Scotland) are under the remit of the Charity Commission. As part of a charities registration, they are required to submit annual financial returns to the regulator, which in the case of large charities such as Unicef UK ("The United Kingdom Committee for Unicef", Charity Number 1072612) ...


49

This graphic appears to be close to the source and lists items but not individual costs. I was able to find a breakdown from 2002 Here’s the breakdown: helmet, $322; uniform, $67.65; body armor, $1,620; nuclear, biological and chemical gear, $341.75, walkie-talkie, $578; boots, $105; M-16 rifle, $586; ...


39

No this allegation is not true. Charities are subject to strict auditing requirements, and UNICEF is no different. i'm going to point you at the report of Canadian UNICEF because I'm more familiar with it it. It says: 4% of your donation goes on administration 20% of your donation is used for fundraising That means 76% goes to the actual programs. That's ...


20

The big complication here is that an individual soldier might have have a lot of equipment allocated to them which isn't necessarily in their possession or immediately available to them at any one time. One example is NBC protection equipment. For example a soldier may be issued with a respirator and a protective suit, respirator filters, decontamination ...


20

I believe the specific coin the article is referring to is the Egyptian Gold Double Eagle. I believe the treaty your article refers to might possibly be one we had with Egypt during the 1940's (although I couldn't say which one). It's poorly written as it is on Wikipedia however, which is probably why there is a [citation needed] tag next to it. When FDR ...


15

No, assuming you mean Central Bank rather than specifically Federal Reserve. Lincoln and JFK actually had very little in the way of removing or even reducing the power of a Central Banking System. Let's examine Presidents (and one Founding Father) that had something to do with a Central/Federal Reserve Bank. Benjamin Franklin One of the Founding Fathers ...


12

I'm afraid the US government and AAPL are very different things. Apple does not have its own currency, nor powers to raise taxes, so its capacity to effect change on its environment is largely determined by its cash pile. It is now, like Porsche, essentially a hedge fund with a retail arm (Braeburn Capital, AAPL's fund, for the story read this article on ...


11

Yes, Sesame Street does stand to lose some federal funding. However, it's important to realize that The Sesame Workshop (the Sesame Street rights holder) receives 31% of its funding (about $26 million) from all grant sources, which also includes corporate sponsorships and chartiable contributions from various foundations and private donors. It's ...


11

The Microfinance Wikipedia article gives a good summary of the state of research here. Research on the effectiveness of microfinance as a tool for economic development remains mixed, in part owing to the difficulty in monitoring and measuring this impact. Here is a paper specifically commissioned by the Grameen Bank to look at the evidence, much of which ...


11

No, it seems the opposite is true. Higher education is correlated with entrepreneurship success. All the examples you give are of entrepreneurs in the tech industry. There is a relevant report from the Kauffman Foundation, called Education and Tech Entrepreneurship, May 2008, Vivek Wadhwa, Richard Freeman, Ben Rissing. This report was limited to U.S.-...


9

S. Dubner (of Freakonomics fame) covered this in one of Freakonomics podcasts: http://freakonomics.com/2012/11/26/i-consult-therefore-i-am-a-new-freakonomics-radio-podcast/ They present evidence both ways, but the "yes" evidence is backed up by a nice study by Nicholas Bloom of Stanford University called "Does Management Matter? Evidence from India". To ...


8

Without getting too deep into the technology behind credit cards with RFID (which you can find here if you're interested), yes, it is possible to copy the data that credit cards broadcast, but it is unlikely that that information will be useful to a criminal if the card issuer was using modern security methods that are now common practice. Snopes posted a ...


8

I don't think the answer is clear yet, but people are finally applying a little scientific method to the problem (especially properly randomised trials). A number of recent studies are referenced on this review site (my emphasis). One review study by the grameen foundation in 2010 (seemingly a fair summary and updating the summary quoted in another answer)...


7

No, the U.S. taxpayers lost about half a trillion dollars on the bailout. This 2019 Annual Review of Financial Economics paper, prepared by Prof. Deborah Lucas from MIT's Sloan School of Business, explains how the half a trillion dollars figure came about. Table 2 summarizes the bailout costs using my preferred metric—a fair value basis around the time ...


5

No. The first thing that needs to be mentioned is that the regulatory environment is very different across (otherwise) similar countries. For example, USA has thousands of registered banks, some of which go bust every year. Meanhile, Canada has a very limiated number of 'Schedule I' banks . So, the bankruptcy rates in Canada are much lower. Given that, ...


3

Did either President Lincoln, Jackson or Kennedy tried to set up any interest free monetary system? Lincoln established interest-free currency (greenbacks): In July 1861, Congress authorized $50,000,000 in Demand Notes. They bore no interest, but could be redeemed for specie "on demand". As explained in History of the Last Quarter Century in the ...


2

That is how microfinancing works. As long as the people understand the terms and conditions that they receive with the loan - there is no scam. The nature of microcredit - small loans - is such that interest rates need to be high to return the cost of the loan. There are three kinds of costs the MFI has to cover when it makes microloans. The first two, ...


2

No the $22m figure is not true, for several reasons. And whatever the figure is, it would be entirely normal practice. The simplest and most obvious reason is that the extrapolation in the article is entirely bogus. There is no explanation of how the supposed growth was calculated, but it looks suspiciously like it was done by projecting a line through the ...


2

No, the article does NOT say that unions "will" be getting $22M as a fact. Quoting from the main article blurb (whatever you call those large-font quotes in middle of the article that are most important points): IF THIS RATE OF GROWTH CONTINUES OVER THE NEXT TEN YEARS, INDUSTRY FUNDS WILL BE PAYING UNIONS $22 MILLION A YEAR BY 2027. So, what the article ...


1

Re "set up any interest free monetary system?" This could use some semantic clarification. The current monetary system is interest-free in that the Federal Reserve Notes you have in your pocket do not earn interest. If you want interest directly guaranteed by the Federal government you have to buy a Treasury bond, bill, or note. Treasury bonds, bills and ...


1

In "The Black Swan" Nassim Taleb writes on page 314 his evidence for the claim: Banks losing all their past profits: Money center banks (around eight banks) had a capital base of around $22bm in 1982. They carried on their books around $54bn of loans to emerging markets, the bulk of which just four countries: Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Venezuela. The ...


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