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61

See Genital Anatomy in Pregnant Adolescents: “Normal” Does Not Mean “Nothing Happened” Pediatrics, January 2004, volume 113, pages e67-e69. METHODS The purpose of this study was to summarize the medical history and genital examination findings in 36 adolescents who were pregnant at the time of, or shortly before, their sexual abuse examination. The ...


54

There is Frankin's letter of Oct 1 1752 saying that the kite experiment was performed successfully in Philadelphia, which was read to and published in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society a few months later. There is also Joseph Priestly's The history and present state of electricity (written about 15 years later after discussions with ...


35

In answer to the question if [what is depicted in linked video] was really possible in 1940? The answer is unequivocally YES - in fact quite a bit earlier. Reanimating a severed head was hypothesised in 1812, first attempted in 1857 and, for the most part, perfected in 1928-29. In 1812, French Physiologist Julian Jean Cesar Legallois hypothesised that a ...


28

There is a double-blind study that was conducted in 2010 in wich 21 experienced violinists were asked to compare violins by Stradivari and Guarneri del Gesu with high-quality new instruments. From the Abstract of the study: The resulting preferences were based on the violinists’ individual experiences of playing the instruments under double-blind ...


17

A History of Neuroscience article titled Genealogy of the "Grandmother Cell" by Charles G. Gross (Princeton University) says that it's fictional, a tall tale: told by Jerry Letvin in 1969 as part of an M.I.T. course he gave. The patient in the story was called Portnoy, whose Complaint was about his mother.


9

No. A much more accurate account is in THE CHARGE OF THE ELECTRON (1935): In 1929 Prof. R. T. Birge (reference 1) published an acutely critical and masterly survey of our knowledge of the fundamental physical constants. It was a very timely summary, and it undoubtedly-if we may borrow from the vocabulary of another trade-did much to promote a ...


8

There is a set of very old urban legends - fictional stories that are widely believed and passed around as true - which are closely related to this story. In the book The Lore of Scotland: A Guide to Scottish Legends (page 291), one variant is presented: In 1824, an account appeared in print of Aberdeen students ganging up on an unpopular sacrist (a ...


8

The story claims, The abdominal organs below the ribcage of all four test subjects had been removed. While the heart, lungs and diaphragm remained in place, the skin and most of the muscles attached to the ribs had been ripped off, exposing the lungs through the ribcage. All the blood vessels and organs remained intact, they had just been taken out and ...


6

The "most epidemiology studies are wrong", perhaps best advanced by John P. A. Ioannidis in Why Most Published Research Findings Are False both extremely common and somewhat flawed, though there are absolutely some worthwhile points in his article. Perhaps the one that amuses me the most is how readily it's been embraced conceptually, even though its ...


5

Summary: The electric shocks given to "victims" in the experiment were fake. A "scientist" ordered "assistant" participants to apply higher and higher voltages; measuring these participants' willingness to obey authority was the true objective. Some of these participants suffered psychological effects such as emotional discomfort, uncontrolled laughter, and ...


5

My understanding is that a person's IQ doesn't change. This is an misunderstanding. When it is corrected, the conflict disappears. (The other answers agree that this is a misunderstanding, but I don't think they adequately illustrate that how very incorrect this is.) First, the provided notability link from Wikipedia does not claim that IQ remains the ...


4

This article from The Committee for Skeptical Inquiry attempts to replicate Emoto's experiment in a properly scientifically controlled manner (with some small caveats), reaching an obvious non-replication (none of the rice rotted significantly). In the end, it appears that Dr. Emoto’s assertion that intention can affect soppy rice doesn’t hold water. I ...


3

Apparently, yes. The same study seems to be discussed here in a radio format. A predecesor group, from Stanford, saw the same thing (see TED talk here.) At first glance, another separate demonstration of this seems to be described here. The mechanism by which this works is not yet understood, but the effect seems to be real.


2

Quoting Megan Scudellari in the Nature Article 'Ageing research: Blood to blood', "For now, any claims that young blood or plasma will extend lifespan are false: the data are just not there. An experiment to test such claims would take upwards of six years — first waiting for the mice to age, then for them to die naturally, then analysing the data." Amy ...


2

Summary: there seems to be strong evidence that IQ is both highly hereditary (in simple terms, "nature"), but is also extremely negatively affected by bad socioeconomic status ("nurture"). If we allow the assumption that the latter effect takes place over a relatively long period of time (as opposed to say, a special few weeks of neglect early on), then we ...


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