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95

No, they are unrelated. Some Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) reconstructions from Wiktionary: "eight": "oḱtṓw" (claimed to be a dual of "four fingers") "night": "nókʷts" (possibly from "bare, naked"). As @Schmuddi mentioned in a comment above, it looks just like a coincidence (slightly similar proto-language words). The rest looks like an urban legend. ...


59

In English "eight" and "night" came from different words, "ehte" and "niht" respectively, which have both undergone a common substitution of -gh- for a hard "h", which was a Middle English scribal habit. In French, "huit" came from "uit" when an "h" was added to avoid confusion with "vit". As for "nuit", it's a transformation of old French "nuict" derived ...


14

Most likely no. X is one of many symbols used for unknowns throughout the history of mathematics, and comes from a notation in the 1600's that used several other letters alongside X. Some Arab mathematicians used the Arabic word for 'thing' to represent an unknown, however it was several hundred years between that and X becoming popular, with many other ...


7

Yes and no. Nazi can be and was a diminutive form of the name Ignatius. In Bavaria and Austria is is no longer that popular in this form now. To name a quite prominent example: Johann Nepomuk Eduard Ambrosius Nestroy (7 December 1801 – 25 May 1862) was a singer, actor and playwright in the popular Austrian tradition of the Biedermeier period and its ...


3

The meme as displayed is anachronistic, ahistorical and a complete confabulation of terms and meanings. It makes really no direct sense whatsoever. But as a symptom to be used as a diagnostic marker it has value. Trotsky didn't invent the word, didn't change much of its meaning or applicability, nor its popularity nor gig he push it into now common usage or ...


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