95

No, they are unrelated. Some Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) reconstructions from Wiktionary: "eight": "oḱtṓw" (claimed to be a dual of "four fingers") "night": "nókʷts" (possibly from "bare, naked"). As @Schmuddi mentioned in a comment above, it looks just like a coincidence (slightly similar ...


78

No, but the association between "tag" and "touch and go" is more than 100 years old. See the 1912 printing of the song A GAME OF TAG: playing tag, Touch and go And in the 1902 Music for the child world: Rhythms, marches and games there is also the song "GAME OF TAG" (music only, no lyrics), with the note below the title "...


59

In English "eight" and "night" came from different words, "ehte" and "niht" respectively, which have both undergone a common substitution of -gh- for a hard "h", which was a Middle English scribal habit. In French, "huit" came from "uit" when an "h" was added to avoid confusion with "vit". As for "nuit", it's a transformation of old French "nuict" derived ...


53

No; however, this is partly due to semantics, the actual log entry is as follows: First actual case of a bug being found. This is a bit of a tongue-in-cheek reference to the term "bug" that was in use at the time meaning: The term "bug" is used to a limited extent to designate any fault or trouble in the connections or working of electric apparatus. ...


48

No. Thomas Edison is in fact credited with the first use of the word Hello on the telephone, and the etymology of the word is well documented. Furthermore, Graham Bell was engaged to Mabel Gardiner Hubbard at the time of the first phone call (and in fact had been courting her for some time), who he eventually went on to marry. There is, in fact, a Snopes ...


19

Flutterby was (or is) used by children as an expression for butterfly. Dialect Notes, Volume 4 was published by American Dialect Society in 1917. It mentions: Some instances of the transposition of syllables [...] are pillercat for caterpiller and flutterby for butterfly in the usage of children. However, the word for butterfly is not derived from that ...


18

The Oxford English Dictionary elaborates: Etymology: German Nazi (c1920), shortened Nationalsozialist or Nationalsozialistisch (see National Socialist adj. and n.). Compare French Nazi (1930). The spelling with z probably arose by analogy with Sozi (shortened Sozialist socialist n. and adj.). The term was originally used by opponents of the ...


18

According to NPR's Codeswitch, the term racism meaning "discrimination or prejudice based on race", was used before 1927. The term as used in the picture you show seems to have a different connotation from the more common one: The Oxford English Dictionary's first recorded utterance of the word racism was by a man named Richard Henry Pratt in 1902. ...


16

Most likely no. X is one of many symbols used for unknowns throughout the history of mathematics, and comes from a notation in the 1600's that used several other letters alongside X. Some Arab mathematicians used the Arabic word for 'thing' to represent an unknown, however it was several hundred years between that and X becoming popular, with many other ...


12

It is quite absurd to claim that Marx did not know that word. Although, in his most important writings the exact letter sequence is indeed not recorded. For example: It is not in the German version of the first edition of the first volume of Das Kapital In lesser known works — it is present. It was a prominent word used by economist David Ricardo which Marx ...


11

To show flutterby is the origin of butterfly, it would need to precede it in time. With the OED pointing to Old English versions of butterfly, and Shakespeare using it several times, perhaps best known in King Lear Act 5 Scene 3 laugh at gilded butterflies this seems unlikely. There are very few examples of flutterby in literature and even fewer claims as ...


10

Created an account just to answer this question. Whilst 'tango' does indeed mean touch, I don't think this is the true origin. It only takes 5 minutes to Google (and/or a knowledge of British 'tag' variants) to know that tag is sometimes called 'tig', although this isn't really in common use in the modern day. Tig's origin is supposedly from the old ...


8

In "The Earliest English Texts", which "is intended to include all the Old-English texts up to about 900": The words for butterfly are buturfliogo buterflege buturfliogae So it is clear that "butter" followed by "fly" is the word order also long ago as is known. (I could use help editting this answer, because I don't fully understand the reference)


8

We find the adjective racist penned by Gaston Mery in the November 18, 1897 issue of La Libre Parole "It is time, in popular meetings, that truly French - truly racist- voices oppose their eloquence to the rhetoric of internationalist boastings" The above passage is from the chapter Birth, Functions and Avatars of the word Racism in the book The Force of ...


8

Although he did not coin it, he may have popularized it afterwards. Trotksy published What is National Socialism in June 1933. I have made racism bold The theory of race, specially created, it seems, for some pretentious self-educated individual seeking a universal key to all the secrets of life, appears particularly melancholy in the light of the history ...


7

Yes. From: Frédéric Buret: "Syphilis to-day and among the ancients, Vol 2-3 – Syphilis in the Middle Ages & Syphilis in Modern Times", Philadelphia: F. A. Davis, 1895, p.48: The second proof emanates from a manuscript of which we have atready spoken in Chapter V of our first volume, and in which it is stated that the Dean of Windsor, Weston, ...


7

Yes and no. Nazi can be and was a diminutive form of the name Ignatius. In Bavaria and Austria is is no longer that popular in this form now. To name a quite prominent example: Johann Nepomuk Eduard Ambrosius Nestroy (7 December 1801 – 25 May 1862) was a singer, actor and playwright in the popular Austrian tradition of the Biedermeier period and its ...


5

There is limited evidence to support the term being in use on an informal basis due to the overlap with engineering due to the electromechanical nature of early computers. However, the terms "bug" or "debugging" could not considered to be widely accepted as having a meaning applied strictly to software until the 1950's. Early computers such as the Harvard ...


4

It appears that it has a different origin - quacksalver - Kwakzalver in contemporary Dutch literally meaning "hawker of salve" In the middle ages Quack meant shouting - as these people would be at the market-place shouting to hawk their wares. And taken from: http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Quackery "Quack" derives from the 17th century word "quacksalver",...


4

Partial answer: Addresses use of "ninja", doesn't address etymology. Several hijab stores refer to a part of the hijab as a ninja, without any sign of being ironic in nature. The page https://www.hijabstoreonline.com/pages/underscarf-guide for example has in its google web search summary The ninja inner underscarf is a relatively new design and is one ...


3

The meme as displayed is anachronistic, ahistorical and a complete confabulation of terms and meanings. It makes really no direct sense whatsoever. But as a symptom to be used as a diagnostic marker it has value. Trotsky didn't invent the word, didn't change much of its meaning or applicability, nor its popularity nor gig he push it into now common usage or ...


3

LаngLаngС found that: "Kapitalismus" does not appear in the German version of Das Kapital Bd. I. It does appear in Das Kapital Bd. II published from Marx's notes after Marx's death. It does appear in Marx's other notes and letters after 1877. Lunchonacho additionally found that: It does appear in multiple places in the 1872 edition. It appears in the ...


1

I had a look at the etymology of capitalism and, according to Wikipedia: The initial usage of the term capitalism in its modern sense has been attributed to Louis Blanc in 1850 and Pierre-Joseph Proudhon in 1861. Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels referred to the capitalistic system (kapitalistisches System) and to the capitalist mode of production (...


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