88

The very next line of the quote you included, from the site you linked was: More info: http://bit.ly/XLKKXb That redirects you to a 2011 news article in Discovery.com called The Other Side of Otters, which includes a witness account: A weaned harbor seal pup was resting onshore when an untagged male sea otter approached it, grasped it with its teeth ...


60

No, the pack is led by the alpha (breeding) females. The picture is taken from the BBC 2011 documentary Frozen Planet. This Guardian article which features pictures from the documentary describes the picture as: A massive pack of 25 timberwolves hunting bison on the Arctic circle in northern Canada. In mid-winter in Wood Buffalo National Park ...


31

There is no suggestion from the original photographers that spiders place water droplets on their heads. Web pages that re-post these photos don't have any references to support the notion. There are at least two photographers who stage these photographs. Consider Dmitriy Yoav Reinshtein whose gallery includes mantis with water droplet "hat" housefly ...


31

This is a myth, because monkeys don't normally eat bananas in the wild. "The entire wild monkey-banana connection in fact is total fabrication," Katharine Milton, who has studied the diets of primates for decades, told Tech Insider. "The edible banana is a cultivated domesticated plant and fruit. Wild monkeys never encounter bananas at all ever unless ...


25

A quick search on Google brings up lots of pages like "The Penguins FAQ" stating it is just a myth: I heard that when Adelie penguins are choosing a mate the male searches for the perfect pebble and presents it to the one he wants as his mate. It's a myth based on the fact that Adelie penguins build nests out of pebbles. And they build the nest while ...


25

Yes, they do share... but not specifically because of the fires or out of a sense of altruism. According to AFP Fact Check: University of Adelaide ecologist Dr. Michael Swinbourne told AFP via email on January 16, 2020: “Wombats will share their burrows with other animals at the same time. I wouldn't say that wombats are "happy" about sharing with other ...


24

The answer is yes, that cats do get stuck in trees and the reason they can't get themselves down is well established. More on that in a bit. As to whether it happens often enough to warrent such a strong featuring in the public psyche is a subjective question and one which is difficult to answer. But the concrete "Does it happen at all" is much easier; a ...


20

Do wind turbines kill many birds each year? In short: An upper estimate might be of the order of half a million birds per year in the USA. However it seems that hundreds of millions of birds are killed by collisions with other man-made structures. So wind turbines account for a small percentage of bird deaths attributable to human activity. Nevertheless ...


19

The first claim in your article The authors estimate they are responsible for the deaths of between 1.4 and 3.7 billion birds and 6.9-20.7 billion mammals annually comes from this article (full-text), where the authors state (table 2) that domestic cats are responsible for the deaths of 1.4-3.7 billion bird deaths and a much larger number of mammal ...


19

The screenshot included in the question contains a block of text with a long interpretation by someone named Gary Moss. Moss's interpretation is that packs of wolves have alpha animals, which go in back, while older, weaker animals go in front. Supposedly the alphas "control the whole group" from behind. The whole concept that a wolf pack is led by an alpha ...


17

In the "Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal" issued by the CDC, there is a report of a trial that involved one pinyon mouse (P. truei) and 19 deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). The trial apparently demonstrated that when removed from the location of the infestation and dislocated at to different distances ranging between 50m and 1200m (0.03 miles ...


15

There is not enough scientific data to prove suicidal behavior in non-human animals. Naturalists have not identified suicide in nonhuman species in field situations, despite intensive study of thousands of animal species. ... Few empirical investigations have been carried out on this topic [1]. Modern naturalistic studies have found little evidence of self-...


14

According to The Lady and Her Tiger, the autobiography of animal trainer and animal rights advocate Pat Derby, at page 75: I remember one occasion when a television commercial was being filmed with a lion and a young model. The manager made a point of asking the girl whether she were menstruating; as it happened, she was, but she wanted the job and said ...


14

Yes, some monkeys do peel bananas from the floral end, if they get access to them, but not all the time. While Sklivvz's answer is correct about the lack of access of monkeys to bananas in the wild, monkeys who live next to humans have access to bananas, and, at least some of them, do peel the banana from the floral side. Here are some videos depicting ...


14

About Rob Pilley, the "zoologist and producer" who gave the Daily news their original quotes. A google scholar search does not turn up any research from him; none of the 120 papers by a R Pilley are zoological in nature. Most of them are probably by other people. He does have a decent list of credits on IMDB. This suggests that he is an expert on making ...


13

The simple answer is yes. The more complex answer is that the number of deaths is nothing in comparison to other man made structures and the risks from climate change. There have been several studies done to find the environmental impact of wind farms on birds. Generally birds lack the ability to dodge humans and their quest for global supremacy. From the ...


13

No. Quoting from Homosexual Behaviour in Animals: An Evolutionary Perspective [page 28] When male Japanese macaques do exhibit an interest in homosexual consortships, female partners will sometimes threaten or attack them and attempt to drive the males away. Pages 147-148 also state that in bison "mildly negative" reactions to female-female sexual ...


11

The answer to this, is Yes, It does appear that elephants are typically restrained using a chain tied around the leg between the foot and carpus (wrist) however No, they are not incapable of breaking free The story of the elephant and the breakable peg, which the elephant does not break crops up repeatedly in life coaching/positive attitude works a great ...


11

The way most Japanese fishing companies actually do this is a process called Ikejime. There are a few different ways to do this but they are all basically the same cause brain death and/or paralysis in the fish in a specific way, in order to keep the fish fresh. Kaimin Katsugyo which uses acupuncture to keep fish alive but docile, this seems to be much ...


11

The claim is plausible. Let's break it down into several components: Q: Are monkeys capable of stealing wallets or learning to use vending machines? A: Certainly. There is ample video evidence of monkeys stealing wallets and using vending machines. Token-based food vending is common practice in studies of animal behavior. Q: Are simians capable of ...


10

Barks are one of the way in which dogs communicate. For example, some barks mean loneliness and can be methodically distinguished from other kinds. Our experiment showed that dogs can perceive the difference between barks originating from different situations, thus barking is perhaps a communicative tool not only for dogs to humans, but for dogs to dogs ...


10

Some animals tend to give specific calls when they discover food or detect particular types of predators. Companions of those animals tend to respond with food searching behavior or adopt some appropriate escape responses and those response signals seem to denote objects in the environment. Per research mentioned below, it can be seen that male rooster (...


10

Evidence: The concept of alpha wolf in wolf packs was based on studies on captive wolves. Most research on the social dynamics of wolf packs, however, has been conducted on wolves in captivity. These captive packs were usually composed of an assortment of wolves from various sources placed together and allowed to breed at will (Schenkel 1947; Rabb et al. ...


9

Yes, but "rudimentary" is a good word for the limits of what has been proven. Dolphins pass the mirror test and can understand word-order syntax (the difference between "bring the ball to the hoop" and "bring the hoop to the ball"): Their performance is high above chance level...it is difficult to interpret their results without postulating both ...


9

Where did this story originate? Is that source reputable? Here's the BBC's version of it: Kidnapped girl 'rescued' by lions Sergeant Wondmu Wedaj told the media from Bita Genet, some 560 kilometres (348 miles) south-west of the capital, Addis Ababa, that they found the girl alive but shocked and terrified. To be honest it doesn't say that the lions ...


9

The Pacific Standard magazine published a critical look at this claim which is available for free on the web. It says the original study started in 2005 and may have received some attention while it was still in progress, but wasn't formally published until 2011. I believe it was published in German, but I cannot find a working link to it. It seems to have ...


7

Its funny how we anthropomorphise almost all animal behaviour that we find even slightly similar to our own. However in this case it's more akin to you bringing home a brick to your girlfriend for building your house, than scouting the local jewelery stores for a dimond ring perfect for her. Gentoo penguins are less likely to stick together than other ...


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