141

Electromagnetic hypersensitivity is believed to be an example of a nocebo. A nocebo is a reverse placebo - one's negative expectations cause harm. EMF exposure hasn't been able to cause symptoms in blind studies. it has proved difficult to show under blind conditions that exposure to EMF can trigger these symptoms. This suggests that “electromagnetic ...


111

Yes, most modern computer processors include hardware with the capability to fully control all components of the computer (regardless of the power state of the system as a whole), to access all data while the computer is running, and to connect to the internet (in any power state). However, the remote control aspect of the functionality this hardware ...


25

This page at Cambridge University says its a myth. There is a burst of energy when you turn them on, but its equivalent to 2 seconds of run time. Also the light lifetime is not seriously affected by turning it off and then on again occasionally. The energy consumed to start a typical lamp is the equivalent of 2 seconds running time, so it is wrong to say ...


20

Yes there are people that believe they have the problem but it does not come from physical exposure from electric fields. It is usually classified as Psychogenic pain, also called psychalgia and can be treated with Cognitive behavioral therapy (ref) caused by a nocebo : The thesis examines various aspects of "electricity hypersensitivity" (EH)....


20

Yes, but from a practical standpoint, don't expect much from them as you aren't going to be getting that much electricity from the antenna. First off, to address the basic claim that you can harvest electricity through the air and use it to do some sort of practical work. This is an emphatic yes as crystal radios are passive devices that are able to ...


17

No, while 337 starlings (<5% of the population) and 2 common wood pigeons were found dead in a Netherlands park, this was not due to a 5G test. The birds died 4 months after the only conducted 5G test and such "bird death" events are quite common. Snopes is my first search result for "The Hague dead birds". They say unexplained bird deaths occurring in ...


11

These articles state it can be done: Washington Post - NSA growth fueled by need to target terrorists The Atlantic Wire - How the NSA Is Using Cell Phone Data to Drone Civilians (In Pakistan) By September 2004, a new NSA technique enabled the agency to find cellphones even when they were turned off. JSOC troops called this “The Find,” and it gave ...


11

What you see in the video is the АЛСН (автоматическая локомотивная сигнализация непрерывного действия) signal, a system for automatic train control used in the ex-Soviet states. Due to the low signalling speed, you can even read the signal from the pulsating bulb, which is here "code Z" (three long pulses separated by short breaks) basically telling a train ...


11

Let me answer the actual question: Is it true that the Intel Management Engine, and/or similar components in other brands of processor, can connect autonomously to the internet when the computer is powered off? In case of ME, the answer is "maybe, in some cases, but usually no". First, there is a question of what specific kind of ME you have. There ...


11

Is keyless theft/relay theft a practical threat for vehicles with fob/keyless entry? Are videos demonstrating it happening practical enough? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bR8RrmEizVg Police in West Midlands, UK have released footage of criminals stealing a car by relaying a signal from the key inside the home, to the car in the driveway. (CNN) and ...


10

Yes, some electronics do have a startup cost (ie. when the power draw is higher during startup than during normal operation). This is observable in PCs, particularly from hard disk drives. Specs from your typical run-of-the-mill desktop hard drive are as follows: WD Caviar Green 5th Generation Specs 2.5TB and 3TB capacities 5400 RPM 64MB cache 3Gb/s SATA ...


9

No, baking a broken graphics card will not necessarily fix it. It is not safe for the graphics card (may cause further problems), and may be a health risk. It is possible to repair failed joints in a reflow oven. (Source) Many options exist for repairing. In one embodiment the repairing can be repeating the reflow operation. This article discusses ...


8

No. Using a tracker does not make you fatter, and that is not what this study claims. Lets start with the participants: Among young adults with a BMI between 25 and less than 40 (so no already fit people here). And this important little note: If weight loss exceeded 6% during each 4-week period or if BMI was 22 or less, prescribed individual ...


8

That Wikipedia article and several visible results from Google searches on this topic appear to draw their information from a Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute press release, http://news.rpi.edu/luwakkey/3074. Going back to the source, it does indeed indicate that exposure to self-luminous displays for less than two hours still has an effect. The actual ...


8

This has gone viral. Yes, the risk is high as the article suggests, this number was estimated (or calculated) by physicist Pete Riley, who receives fundings form NASA, NSF, and DoD. His recent publications can be found here. Here is a direct quote from NASA, this was posted on July 25 2014: In February 2014, physicist Pete Riley of Predictive Science ...


7

Absolutely, and there are two sides to this which appear successful: Induction: Nokia are one of those manufacturing products in this space to wirelessly charge batteries in mobile devices, along with manufacturers of electric toothbrushes, shavers, computer mice etc: All you need to do with one of these is pop your device on top of the wireless charger ...


6

Magnets affect electrons only when they are moving. The force on an electron in a magnetic field is proportional to its speed. If it is stationary, the force is zero. In LCD screens there are no moving electrons, except when the image changes, so there cannot be any effect with a steady display. Any effect during a moving display will be very small (because ...


5

Yes, in some cases. The risk seems to depend on the cell phone and pacemaker involved. Apparently there's no conflict in some cases, while there can be in other cases. The American Heart Association (ACA) does warn that some newer cell phones can make pacemakers less reliable. Given these risks, it makes sense that Japanese trains - which are notorious ...


5

Has anyone any got any statistics on the number of deaths and injuries from electrical plugs in Britain, and compared them to other areas that do not have these safety features in their power plugs? Probably not, many have looked for such data without success. The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is often used to record causes of death. This ...


5

The Hot-Plug-Detection feature is part of the HDMI protocol. All data-lines are quiet until a hotplug-event is detected via the physical pin 19. A handshake then negotiates a real connection: The HPD (Hot-Plug-Detect) feature is a communication mechanism between a source and a sink device that makes the source device aware that it has been connected/...


4

Can static electricity build up in vacuum cleaners, and in particular, their nozzles? Yes, vacuum cleaners can indeed build up a noticeable static charge. The amount of charge buildup can vary depending on several factors, such as the type of vacuum cleaner used, the amount and type of dust present, and, as with any static buildup, ambient air humidity. ...


4

It is not possible. Nor inside the car or anywhere else. A car is a metal cage (Faraday cage): A Faraday cage operates because an external static electrical field causes the electric charges within the cage's conducting material to be distributed such that they cancel the field's effect in the cage's interior. This phenomenon is used, for example, to ...


4

Yes, it can. This video explains why it works This test works equally well for AA, AAA, C, D and 9 Volt alkaline batteries. It is our understanding that the following chemical reactions occur and helps to explain our observations. A non-rechargeable alkaline battery begins life using zinc powder mixed into a gel containing a potassium ...


4

Roger Grimes is a computer security professional. In late 2017, he wrote an article for CSO describing his search for confirmed examples of people having the credit cards skimmed by an RFID reader: I’ve frequently said that I can’t find a single documented case of RFID credit card crime. [...] I decided that I was going to hunt down that data, ...


4

Actually The English Wikipedia has a great page about J. C. Bose. Bose went to London on a lecture tour in 1896 and met Italian inventor Guglielmo Marconi, who had been developing a radio wave wireless telegraphy system for over a year and was trying to market it to the British post service. In an interview, Bose expressed his disinterest in commercial ...


4

For a TLDR version, jump to the last paragraph. Since AccuBattery links to another paper than the one they actually cited, I felt like double checking if they represented the paper correctly... and they do. Here's the abstract of Choi and Lim, (who stated their affiliation as Samsung) "Factors that affect cycle-life and possible degradation mechanisms of a ...


4

Snopes actually has more details refuting the sequence of events; because tests of 5G use yet unallocated spectrum, they need special regulatory approval. One such test did occur in an area generally near Huijgenspark, but it took place on 28 June 2018, and it was not followed by a massive bird die-off. For this test, the Dutch equivalent of the FCC ...


3

It depends on the metal and the microwave. This video shows what happens with a crumpled sheet of aluminium foil: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKQ9vC_DK_c Gold banding on cups is also notorious for causing arcing. However, I was mildly surprised to learn that metal can be placed in a microwave - the USDA says that smooth aluminium foil should be okay (...


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