17

It is difficult to prove that it is impossible to train dogs to detect hypoglycemia. All that can be done to disprove this claim is to show systematic efforts to train dogs have failed, and that no-one has been able to demonstrate that it is possible. In 2013, such an attempt was tried: Can Trained Dogs Detect a Hypoglycemic Scent in Patients With Type 1 ...


8

I work in Diabetes research in the UK and Can find no evidence to support the wild claims in the paper, press release and press reports. Sadly hidden away in a table in supplementary data is the fact that the result of improved glucose is a result folrom 3 people who had the vaccine compared to 3 had placebo. This very small number makes it very likely that ...


5

This is not a complete answer; perhaps if someone has a copy of the book they can build on this. I've been unable to find the full text for the original claim and its methodology. The statements and maps in the video are apparently based on this site: [source: New York Times Jan. 9, 20061 Global diabetes map from NY Times Jan 9, 2006.] Its a fallout/...


4

tl;dr: Yes: as an additional treatment option or preferred food choice this vegetable brings more than taste to the table. The effects of the original claim are substantiated, on a certain scale, and others on top of that. It will not cure, but it may very well help. The indicators and the evidence is slowly mounting. Traditional Uses The fruits of this ...


3

Is it possible to train dogs to detect hypoglycemia? Two studies suggest that dogs can detect hypoglycemia. The mechanism whereby they detect this state is unknown - the example linking scent, for instance, may be a baseless supposition for marketing purposes. In the 2008 paper Canine responses to hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes the ...


3

I am addressing the general issue of why two lists might have different values for the GI for potatoes, and ignoring any mechanism for how boiling or baking may affect the GI. The story is far more complicated that these simple lists might suggest. The South Beach Diet Plan's Web-Site list provides no references, so that is the first strike against it. ...


3

There are no published trials of raw food diets in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The best we have are trials using vegan diets where there is some evidence of efficacy in promoting weight loss, lowering cholesterol levels and HbA1c levels. This 74 week trial by Neal Barnard et al showed that vegan diet was superior to the traditional diabetes diet ...


3

No. The study doesn't claim that and the results are very weak anyway This story is an interesting case where the headlines exaggerated the claims and the claims were far weaker than many supposed anyway. What the study actually claimed The study didn't claim that anyone had been cured from type 1 diabetes. The paper says: This 8-year-long Phase 1 trial ...


2

Andrew H's answer is only somewhat correct, the 3 patients were only the first phase of the first phase (ha), the grand total seems to be 9; still this treatment is controversial, something that was hinted well enough in the source used for the question (at the end of the article, several experts cautioned about the small sample size). Another article ...


2

I believe I found the answer to my question: According to the "International table of glycemic index and glycemic load values: 2002" published by The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, mean of 4 studies of baked potatoes is 85 (+/-12), whereas mean of 5 studies of boiled or cooked potatoes is 50 (+/-9). Of course, I agree with Oddthinking that the ...


1

As a partial answer, I found this journal article: Increasing Prevalence of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Among United States Adolescents, 1988-1994 to 2007-2010. The authors diagnosed NAFLD using weight and liver enzymes that were recorded as part of a study on a large, representative sample of adolescents (NHANES). Since they made the diagnosis based on ...


1

Yes, probably. Using the same link to the American Diabetes Association (http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/myths/): Myth: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. Fact: The answer is not so simple. Type 1 diabetes is caused by genetics and unknown factors that trigger the onset of the disease; type 2 diabetes is caused by genetics and lifestyle ...


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