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96

What the writings by Sullins say Invisible Victims: Delayed Onset Depression among Adults with Same-Sex Parents is available online: Retrospective questions at Waves III and IV asked about adult mistreatment during childhood, including whether a parent or caregiver had “slapped, hit or kicked you,” said “things that hurt your feelings or made you feel ...


47

In addition to the two versions of the claim in the question, the claim is repeated here by Andrew Solomon. I could not find other instances of the claim online. The article seems to have been presented at the NIMH (National Institute of Mental Health) Alliance for Research Progress Meeting. I was particularly taken by a study in which a group of ...


17

As per Wikipedia's by-country list of depression in "Epidemiology of depression": Rank Country DALY rate ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 1 United States 1,454.74 127 Russia 856.718 So; while Russia's rate is indeed, only officially 60% that of USA, it's incorrect to say that Russians don't get depressed. Additionally; ...


10

The claim is not supported by the research the article is based on The linked article says "Russians Don't Get Depressed", but they base that on a study which says nothing of the sort. The actual study focusses on the effects of what they call "self-reflection", not on depression itself: In Study 1, self-reflection was associated with fewer depressive ...


9

No. Ben Goldacre - Guardian science writer and proprietor of the Bad Science blog - wrote an article entitled "Tell Me Now How do I Feel" in Jan 2011 and mentioned it again on Twitter. He also wrote an earlier, well-referenced, article in 2009: "'Blue Monday' is churnalism, beware any journalist who puffs it" To quote: Antidepressant prescriptions have ...


9

TL;DR: It's more complicated than the dichotomy "fat=jolly, slim=unhappy" or vice versa. It depends on culture. The report that this newspaper article was based upon is: Patrik K. E. Magnusson, Finn Rasmussen, Debbie A. Lawlor, Per Tynelius and David Gunnell, Association of Body Mass Index with Suicide Mortality: A Prospective Cohort Study of More than One ...


8

Gluten-free diet and depression in individuals with NON-CELIAC GLUTEN SENSITIVITY Non-celiac gluten sensitivity refers to intestinal and other symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten in the absence of celiac disease and wheat allergy. The article from the question mentions few studies in which gluten-free diet was associated with less depression in ...


7

Yes and no. Usually the "chemical imbalance" is the consumer-oriented version of the serotonin hypothesis for depression. The most practiced method of testing this experimentally (and practically the only one available for live humans) is acute tryptophan depletion (ATD); tryptophan is a precursor for serotonin. It's been experimentally verified via PET ...


7

I don't have access to the full article, but the most interesting part of the abstract (to me) is the scale used to measure depression. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression used to be the standard test, and was created in 1960. This original test had 17 questions (aka HRSD-17 or HAM-D17), and is the version used by the study mentioned. Since then, there ...


5

Suicide: Yes (New York Times, study), but not just millennials: Suicide in the United States has surged to the highest levels in nearly 30 years, a federal data analysis has found, with increases in every age group except older adults. The rise was particularly steep for women. It was also substantial among middle-aged Americans... Accidental Drug ...


4

You have to be very careful reading studies as shown - many of them conflate the nuclear family with everything other than the nuclear family, including single parents, and make the conclusion that the nuclear family is the only way forward. Outlined very well in Slate. There is a link in that article that I can't add to The New Republic outlining these ...


4

Violent or anti-social music lyrics may provide a short-term catharsis for depression and feelings of alienation, by giving the listener the company that mysery is said to crave. In larger doses, however, the negative emotions expressed in those songs are apt to work at ingraining the attitudes they portray in their lyrics into the minds of their listeners, ...


3

The article you refer to seems biased and misleading. It quotes multiple serious-looking papers, then reaches a conclusion not mentioned in any of them. Several articles (e.g. this and this) claim that anti-depressants are not so efficient in curing depression - after you stop taking them, depression often returns. One article reports a correlation between ...


3

This particular claim does seem to be supported by the study: rumination is more common among Russians but it is not indicative of depression (unlike rumination in Americans). However, the framing of the paper presented in the article is misleading. The study has nothing to do with actual rates of depression, which, as mentioned by @CPerkins, might be ...


2

I can't find a scientific article with this claim or anything like it made explicit, but a quick search of the scientific literature turns up research that suggests this may be the case. Melancholic microbes: a link between gut microbiota and depression? investigates possible links between bacteria in the guts and depression. The title ends in a question ...


2

This is not even wrong. Depression is related to alterations of serotonin, dopamine transmitters and more: On the Complexity of Brain Disorders: A Symptom-Based Approach: Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by reduced mood, anhedonia, psychomotor retardation, and learned helplessness, among others (Kennedy, 2008). It ...


1

Vitamin D supplementation at the level of 800 IU per day does not appear to be an effective treatment for Seasonal Affective Disorder in older women. "Winter depression" is properly known as "Seasonal Affective Disorder" (SAD) or "major recurrent depressive disorder with seasonal pattern". As the name suggests, it's recurrent depression that occurs and ...


1

Yes. Per Xuguang Guo et al's 2014 study (Dr Honglei Chen is the part of this research group), "compared to nondrinkers, drinking coffee or tea without any sweetener was associated with a lower risk for depression, adding artificial sweeteners, but not sugar or honey, was associated with higher risks. Frequent consumption of sweetened beverages, especially ...


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