90

We do know that (at least one of) his dentures used human teeth, as you can see in this picture of the exhibit (taken from Snopes), which says: Contrary to popular myth, Washington’s false teeth were not made of wood but of human and cow teeth as well as elephant ivory. In addition, the official website of Mount Vernon notes that: Washington bought ...


46

Do we need to brush our teeth? Yes, there are health benefits from brushing your teeth. Done correctly, it reduces the incidence of caries and periodontitis. When you brush your teeth, you help remove plaque — a sticky film that forms on your teeth because of bacteria in your mouth. The bacteria in plaque causes the two major tooth-related diseases, ...


40

Wikipedia article on decidious teeth references the picture from Gray's Anatomy. Google search also gives some references. Scheme on Colgate professional. Article in dentist Rick Wilsond blog featuring X-Ray picture from 9 year old: And also child's skull from Hunterian Museum in London: Okay I think it's enough for this answer. So, I assume there're no ...


38

There are only three studies in PubMed that mention CrissCross bristle design explicitly. The first, authored by Oral-B Laboratories, finds that "comparisons with more than 80 leading manual toothbrushes from around the world demonstrate a consistent, significant advantage for the new CrossAction toothbrush, both with respect to interproximal penetration ...


23

Reference - Marcus v. United States Environmental Protection Agency, 92-TSC-5 (ALJ Dec. 3, 1992) Contentions of The Parties Dr. William Marcus (Complainant) alleges that he was subjected to a hostile work environment and later terminated because of a memo he drafted and released that warned of potential harm from the use of fluoride, contrary to the ...


21

I found several small studies looking at (a) the effectiveness of flossing, and (b) the amount of flossing that happens in different groups. However, you seemed to be after larger studies. I couldn't find any large studies, but what I could find were meta-analyses, where they systematically look for small, high-quality studies and put the data together to ...


21

Yes, according to the American Dental Association, chewing suger-free gum does have the benefit of increasing saliva flow which helps to neutralize and wash way acids that may be generated by bacteria in plaque on your teeth. Additionally, some chewing gum also has additives that also assist in building up your teeth. However, this does not apply to all ...


20

A journal article on the topic found a negligible (but non-zero) effect of carbonated waters on tooth enamel. The claim in the Daily Mail is clearly in dissonance with the results from this study. Dissolution levels with all of the mineral waters were very low and for several still waters were undetectable. (...) De-gassing of a sparkling mineral water ...


15

Yes, fluoridated water works to reduce dental caries in children. This answer originally consisted of one study based in the USA. This was revealed to be insufficient by a significant edit to @Skeptic's answer, which contained eight similar studies from different regions, drawing different results. In such situations, where there are conflicting studies, ...


15

According to Michael Sesemann (president of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry 2009-2010): Brushing should last at least two minutes. Three minutes is even better. It's an arbitrary number, but it's just so people take the time to clean all the surfaces. The American Dental Association recommends: Brush your teeth twice a day... but ...


13

Dental X-rays are not 100% free of risk. However, they are very, very low risk. Given people take risks with radiation every day (going into the sun, eating bananas), it is reasonable to accept the risks of dental X-rays to gain the health benefits associated with their diagnostic abilities. This xkcd info-graphic puts the risk in perspective - click to ...


13

Bottom line: It doesn't matter if you floss before or after brushing your teeth. This question has been debated endlessly within the dental community. On this site it is really hard to conclude which one is better due to many different papers like you cited and many different points of views from dentists and professionals. I will cite one answer only ...


11

According them them, their 4 essential oils are Eucalyptol Menthol Methyl salicylate Thymol Menthol, Thymol and Eucalyptol do have known antibacterial effects. I'm having difficulty finding anything specifically on Methyl salicylate (wintergreen oil), but their claims of efficacy against plaque seem plausible. Additionally, a Japanese study comparing ...


11

In summary: There is not sufficient evidence to show that Vitamin D has a preventative effect on dental caries. It is plausible, and following the recommended intake of Vitamin D is important for a number of health reasons, but there is no solid evidence to show that it alone is adequate for the prevention of dental caries. Fluoride, on the other hand, has ...


10

This was a fun journey. The first couple of links didn't have any references, but the third one did. Not only did it propose a mechanism, but it ascribed it to "Dr. Perls" and "Dr. Roizen". Picking the second doctor (with the biggest claim) at random. His name is Michael F. Roizen, MD. of the Cleveland Clinic. His claims are somewhat controversial - ...


10

Summary: A. Using fluoridated toothpaste in both children and adults reduces the risk of dental caries. B. Fluoridated toothpaste increases the risk of dental fluorosis only when children 8 years old or younger swallow it, in which case fluoride is absorbed, enters the blood and from there the teeth. Fluoride in children in adults does not enter the teeth ...


10

This Wikipedia page contains all you ever wanted to know on the controversy and has 99 citations, a lot of which are to peer-reviewed material and meta-studies. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dental_amalgam_controversy In particular, the section "Clinical Trials", says clearly that the safety of silver fillings is disputed: Clinical trials Conducted ...


10

Unlikely. First of all, there are at least five different YouTube videos where people try it out and have no problems. Here is one that includes various sizes and shapes. Secondly, if this were possible, it is likely that cases would appear in the medical literature, but they don't. It is not difficult to find documented cases of light bulbs stuck in ...


10

It won't prevent, it can reduce the harm of drinking soda, but only in a specific usage, which is not the common one, using a straw in the "wrong" way would cause more damage to the teeth. The article in question cites the article Influence of drinking patterns of carbonated beverages on dental erosion which reviews two case studies of teens (16 and 18 ...


9

Fluoride Alert is an anti-fluoridation group and has no credibility in the scientific community. The fluoride in toothpaste has a concentration of 1,000 to 1,500 ppm of fluoride (which is considerably higher than fluoridated water at 0.7 ppm). A small child would need to eat approximate two tubes of toothpaste in order to become seriously ill. However, ...


9

There is significant discussion of this issue in Fluoride in Drinking Water: Scientific Review of EPA's Standards (2006), particularly in chapter 8, Effects on the Endocrine System. This book is a publication of the US National Research Council. As with other calcifying tissues, the pineal gland can accumulate fluoride (Luke 1997, 2001). Fluoride has ...


8

Answer: Yes, it probably does. I found this referenced answer on authoritynutrition.com. The catechins in green tea have other biological effects as well. Some studies show that they can kill bacteria and inhibit viruses like the influenza virus, potentially lowering your risk of infections (31, 32, 33, 34). Streptococcus mutans is the ...


8

By Region The following studies from different regions suggest that fluoridation does not reduce dental caries: Kuoio, Finland There was no increase in caries when water fluoridation ended in Kupio, Finland during the following three years. Caries in the primary dentition, after discontinuation of water fluoridation, among children receiving ...


8

If brushing your teeth with traces of acid in your mouth really is dangerous, shouldn't we hear about it without mentioning of vomit? Yes, and we do (from Colgate): You should know, however, that brushing your teeth after eating can sometimes affect your tooth enamel. According to the Mayo Clinic, if you've consumed anything acidic, you should avoid ...


6

Effects of coconut oil on oral health: A 2016 study showed coconut oil pulling to be a safe and effective alternative to Chlorhexidine mouthwash since there was a significant reduction in Streptococcus mutans count. Conclusion: Oil pulling can be explored as a safe and effective alternative to Chlorhexidine. Clinical significance: Edible oil-pulling ...


6

Mew's orthotropics are considered fringe or pseudoscience because they lack the standard scientific support such as randomized controlled trials. Sir, I was bemused to find myself reading the book review of J. Mew's book in the 9 May edition of the BDJ (216: 493) whilst the radio news announced another controversy regarding the publication of ...


5

The direction of brushing matters. Brushing horizontally with a stiff brush can lead to a horizontal scoring at the gum line, thinning the enamel there. Electric toothbrushes generally have rotating heads so their fast motion cannot do this, but a strong horizontal brusher using a stiff bristle brush can do this inadvertently. Correct brushing is primarily ...


5

Such statements are not to be intended in the "scientific" sense. They are marketing materials and are not claimed to be representative of all dentists. Stock phrases such as "Recommended by nine out of ten dentists" in commercials for non-prescription consumer healthcare products such as Sensodyne toothpaste are devised by the parent company's Global ...


5

There has been talk of link between gum disease and heart disease for quite some time. There is an article discussing how Streptococcus bacteria can migrate from the mouth to the heart here: How cavity-causing microbes invade heart A statistical study looking at tooth loss and heart disease also talks about a potential link, and seems to have eliminated ...


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