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118

This is one of the more irritating claims I hear repeated. It's not specific to the US either. The answer is no, merchants have no obligation to accept money for a purchase. The simple reason is that US currency is only legal tender for debts. It is illegal to refuse legal tender for a debt. When you make a purchase at a store, there is no debt. Rather, ...


29

This really depends what you mean by where Euro banknotes are from. It can either mean by which country they are issued (which would be most logical) or where they were physically printed (note, that physically printing is not done by all Eurozone countries, and some non-Euro countries do the printing). In either case you can find information in the ...


21

Just want to point out that while Sonny Ordell said that it is not specific to the U.S... here in Canada, we have a law regarding what has legal tender or not and in what context. Under the Canadian Currency Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. C-52), there is a limit to the value of a transaction for which one can use only coins to pay for a product or service: A ...


16

Alright, this question stays in the top list, because nobody has "answered" it. So let's see. According to this article: Rs 2000 Currency Note With Nano GPS Chip – Hoax or Not? World’s smallest fully integrated GPS receiver has been developed by OriginGPS Nano Spider, which measures 4x4x2.1mm. You can see the chip here. It's small, but not flat enough ...


16

The answer is likely to be no, the customer cannot specify the form of the change. Effectively you ended up in the position that you (or the owner of the gas station) owed the customer $19. So long as you provided legal tender of $19, that would be enough to extinguish the debt so long as you had not previously agreed anything else with the customer or had ...


15

Yes. In Australia in 2005. This was reported in the Sunshine Coast Daily Defacing bank notes costs $500 23rd March 2005 Damien John Lebret pleaded guilty to twice defacing 10 paper money notes with a black felt tip pen before depositing his rent money into an account at ANZ Bank at Kawana Waters last month. [...] The Crimes (Currency) ...


13

While the accepted answer is accurate for US currency, different laws exist in different countries. In Norway, cash is considered legal tender and a merchant is therefore required to always accept it. The only limitations are that the merchant can deny more than 25 coins of a single unit, and can deny damaged or torn money. This is regulated by the §14 of ...


11

Yes and no, while the $20 note is the most commonly encountered counterfeit bill in the United States, the $100 note is the most common counter fit bill in worldwide circulation. It appears that the $20 note is typically the bill most likely to be attributed to being counterfeited in various factoids without that distinction. However, in journalistic ...


11

Yes and No According to numerous studies some of more visible prices go up significantly, however overall the price increase is very limited. OECD paper analyzing the subject few months before Slovakia switched to Euro and predicting what effect it could have on Slovak economy: THE EURO CHANGEOVER IN THE SLOVAK REPUBLIC: IMPLICATIONS FOR INFLATION AND ...


10

TL;DR: $100 notes are counterfeited more overall, but there are more low-quality $20 forgeries than low-quality $100 forgeries (by count, but not by face-value). The study Estimating the Volume of Counterfeit U.S. Currency in Circulation Worldwide: Data and Extrapolation contains a long evaluation of the problem. Unfortunately, due to an unexplained error, ...


9

Not in the USA for Coins, many places like Six Flags, Sea World have machines that will deface pennies to imprint their logo on them, it is only against the law if done to commit fraud, See Title 18, Part 1, chapter 17, 331 Whoever fraudulently alters, defaces, mutilates, impairs, diminishes, falsifies, scales, or lightens any of the coins coined at the ...


7

You can determine which country it was printed for, but not necessarily which country it was printed in. By examining one of its more important design elements, you can identify the "central bank that commissioned the printing of a banknote (but not necessarily the country of printing)" according to this web site:   ECB: Banknotes - Design elements &...


6

Here's what we know: The 64-year-old (Dorian Prentice Satoshi Nakamoto) fervently denied being "the" Satoshi Nakamoto, and even claimed he only recently heard of Bitcoin Satoshi Nakamoto broke a lengthy online silence to deny being Dorian Newsweek's story relied entirely on circumstantial evidence Numerous other news outlets excoriated Newsweek for its ...


2

Does Navarro have a point here? According to a Washington Post article: "I think [Navarro] has a point, in that Germany has basically set up the rules in the euro area to suit itself, and if they hadn’t been a euro area, the German currency, the Deutsche Mark, would be much stronger now, and that would hurt their exports," said Joseph Gagnon, a senior ...


2

Tracking currency with an integrated GPS/RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification) system is still in various stages of research and currently not in implementation in any country of the world. 1) North Dakota State University has created a method of creating laser RFID which would write an RFID on paper or currency (see http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/...


1

Yes. There are exactly two ways. Bitcoin, or more specifically the blockchain, needs constant auditing by powerful computers which have power as well as cooling needs. If the government controls electricity, as China does, they can effectively choke out the bitcoin miners (auditors) in their country. If the number of miners goes down to the point where any ...


1

I am Italian, and can confirm that most of the prices doubled in the two years after the introduction of the Euro. For the first year we had double currency, with merchants forced to show both prices. In that period prices stayed basically unchanged. On the second year the double pricing stopped and most commodities went up rapidly. The merchants played on ...


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