21

Latest study confirms that the chances increase due to a variety of factors diminishing immune response, at least in mouse cells: Temperature-dependent innate defense against the common cold virus limits viral replication at warm temperature in mouse airway cells (Ellen F. Foxman, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1411030112) ... To gain insight into the mechanism of ...


12

It sounds like this is a Russian variant of a common home remedy of inhaling steam as a decongestant. [Examples: The Health Site, WebMD] The Cochrane Library reviewed the evidence: Heated, humidified air for the common cold. There is not enough evidence to show if steam inhalation improves or exacerbates nasal congestion when a person has a cold The ...


9

Ginger has anti-inflammatory properties. It inhibits the induction of several genes involved in the inflammatory response [1]. It mostly modulates biochemical pathways activated in chronic inflammation. It also enhances thermogenesis and reduces feelings of hunger [2]. When it comes to anti-viral effects, it was found that fresh ginger is effective against ...


7

Strepsils My packet of strepsils contains a leaflet saying each lozenge contains 2,4-Dichlorobenzyl alcohol 1.2 mg Amylmetacresol 0.6 mg Levomenthol 8.0 mg. 2,4-Dichlorobenzyl alcohol and Amylmetacresol A throat lozenge containing amyl meta cresol and dichlorobenzyl alcohol has a direct virucidal effect on respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and ...


5

I don't think the viruses responsible for the common cold can hide in the bone, though CMV can hide in the bone marrow. You mentioned rhinoviruses, and these infect epithelial cells. As to the question as to whether some of the viruses responsible for the common cold can hide, and then emerge to reinfect people, then the evidence seems to be yes where ...


4

'Cold' is just a name given to the rhinoviruses that cause cold symptoms, the idea that going out into the cold would cause a cold was just a traditional idea, not necessarily based on anything other than biased observations. Source All this said, it is true that colds, and more specifically flu, are more prevalent in winter months, and that this is true, ...


3

TL/DR: There are no quality studies supporting the Pentoxyverine. The class of drugs that Pentoxyverine belongs to does not have strong support either. Our good friends at the Cochrane Collaboration, who do high-quality meta-analyses, looked at over-the-counter cough medicines: Smith, S. M., Schroeder, K. and Fahey, T. (2009), Cochrane review: Over-the-...


3

Plausible, but under-researched. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has this to say about UV germicidal irradiation (UVGI): There have been few published studies of the health benefits of applying UVGI systems in ducts of HVAC systems outside of health care facilities. In a study within three office buildings [50], UVGI systems were turned on and off ...


2

If it really works as decongestant, then it may prevent opportunistic bacterial coinfections. Not a peer-reviewed source, but at least doctor is interviewed. http://health.usnews.com/health-news/news/articles/2012/03/21/antibiotics-useless-for-most-sinus-infections-experts-say However, actual peer-reviewed paper says the evidence is weak. http://www.ncbi....


2

There has been a burst of popular presss articles saying that wearing a scarf that covers the mouth and nose can prevent the common cold by keeping the upper respritory tract temperature high and making it less suitable for the virus. For example: Common Cold Could Be Prevented by Wearing a Scarf over the Nose The actual basis for these articles is the ...


2

See Common Cold Centre at Cardiff University which says There may never be a cure for the common cold! It is very unlikely that we are going to see a cure for the common cold because of the following problems- • Common cold is not a single disease but a syndrome of symptoms caused by many different viruses. Defeating smallpox with a single ...


1

The best I can say, is that there are various studies regarding the anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of all the allium family, including the scallion. analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the Allium Ascalonicum (scallion) In conclusion this study has shown that the acqueous and methanol extracts of Allium ascalonicum have mild analgesic ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible