208

Misleading at best Oracle is completely different from AWS. This quote is wrong such that it's comparing apples to oranges. Ellison is claiming that Amazon is using Oracle's database to run their apps and services, and implying that it's possible to instead use Amazon Web Services. Amazon did (and does as of 2018) use Oracle database systems, as Ellison ...


71

From the Ph.D. thesis "The Social Life of Measures: Metrication in the United States and Mexico, 1789--2004": As of today [September 2011] there are seven non-metric countries in the world: Liberia, Myanmar, United States, Independent State of Samoa, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, and Marshall Islands. In the discussions about metrication it ...


51

Apple Inc. did sue NYC, however it was not about "Big Apple" nickname, but the logo that went along with it — a stylized apple. Apple filed a federal challenge to New York's trademark application for a new "Big Apple" logo, saying it's too similar to the stylized emblem found on iPhones, iPods and iMac computers. Cupertino, Calif.-based ...


49

Amazon uses both AWS and the Oracle relational database system to run their business. The quote by Larry Ellison is very misleading but not outright false. Amazon uses AWS infrastructure to run their business, This includes machines (presumably managed in house by something like their RDS service) running the Oracle database service. AWS stands for Amazon ...


36

According to a well-sourced wikipedia article, those three countries are the only three that have "some adoption", whereas all the others have "partially complete" adoption (UK, Malaysia, Canada, Jamaica), "almost entirely complete" adoption (8 countries) or "complete" adoption (all the rest of the world). Countries by current metrication status: ...


28

Apparently, they are currently in the process of migrating from Oracle to AWS. According to an interview with "one of the people" published in August 2018 by CNBC: Amazon began moving off Oracle about four or five years ago, said one of the people, who asked not to be named because the project is confidential. Some parts of Amazon's core shopping ...


26

This seems to be a genuine product. The Hindustan Times report above, which seems to be the origin of most of the non-Indian reports, gives considerable detail on the name of the manufacturing company and the name of the owner, which it would be unlikely for even a semi-reputable newspaper to do without fact-checking. It also gives details about the ...


16

It was covered by ABC and referenced by Business Week. There's also three stories from the local paper which first broke the news: Chicken Head Found In Wing Box Mother Still Dealing With Her Discovery. What Harm, This Fouled-Up Fryer? (Peninsula Health District says that there's nothing physically wrong with eating a fried chicken head). USDA Officer Says ...


7

Isabel Anderson, wife of US ambassador to Japan (December 1912-March 1913) Larz Anderson, wrote in her book The Spell of Japan: On St. Valentine's day I took some presents out to Watanabe's house, where I had asked all the children of the compound to gather. There were about a dozen of them, sitting on mats and making a very pretty group. ... Then I told ...


5

I was a manager for KFC for a few years. They fly all managers down for training in Kentucky and we all hear the history of KFC. Long story short: He developed the recipe on his own while caring and cooking for siblings when his mother joined the workforce after the death of his father during the depression. Fast forward to 1930 when he was working out ...


3

Is there any evidence that the flower-selling industry is responsible for creating Mother's day, or at least for pushing it to the popularity it has now? Yes. In the USA, the current Mother's Day holiday was enacted by a joint resolution of Congress on May 8th, 1914. Prior to being made a federally recognized day, florists did play a role in promoting the ...


2

I think I found the person responsible for this quote, saying something very similar a decade later. Faber-Castell is a pencil business based in Germany, owned by a single aristocratic family. Shades of grey, and other hues, put lead in pencil sales (The Australian) It all adds up to a pretty picture for Andreas Wilhelm von Faber-Castell, the managing ­...


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