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160

According to the 1930 version of Stack Exchange, Popular Questions Answered: What are the clothing colors for baby boys and girls? According to a traditional color scheme, which is of unknown origin, baby boys are properly dressed in pink clothing and baby girls in blue, although in some parts of the country, particularly in the Southern States, ...


101

If Homer talks about the dark-wine sea, it seems he also talks about the "blue eyebrows of Poseidon". You can read here about Homer's colorful descriptions that helped orators remember the verses of his poems. κυανό is known to be "blue" for ancient greeks and became "cyan" in english. In this book about Homer writing, κυανό entry represents "smalt, blue ...


89

The first claim is based on the research of Berlin and Kay "Basic Color Terms", which posits the hypothesis that languages evolve colour terms in the following order, and therefore that ancient languages did not possess separate terms for blue and green: Stage I: Dark-cool and light-warm Stage II: Red Stage III: Either green or yellow Stage IV: Both green ...


75

According to a post on the designer's Facebook page (and as reported by finder.com.au), it's fake: Hey guys! So our 'colour changing dress' has garnered a LOT of attention and questions, so here's some more information.... Although we haven’t invented the product *yet*, we think we could soon with your help! If you’re a student and study STEM subjects ...


48

This claim originated in a 1987 paper by Jo Paoletti, a researcher in American Studies, and was presented in expanded form in a 2012 book by the same author. In these publications, Paoletti did not argue that pink and blue had been reversed, but only that their use had been inconsistent prior to the 1950s. It is unclear how and when this initial argument ...


32

It would seem to be correct. The following is an extract the Nature Journal's archive: For example, in a building camouflaged with large irregular patches of colour, the actual outline of the building may be lost in the jumble of these patterns. But the colour-blind person may be scarcely conscious of the variegated colours, so that to him the ...


31

Ancient Hebrew has the word תכלת for blue (or more specifically, azure), as attested to in the Bible: Numbers 15:38: Speak to the children of Israel and you shall say to them that they shall make for themselves fringes on the corners of their garments, throughout their generations, and they shall affix a thread of sky blue [wool] on the fringe of each ...


20

Not in Russia - boys/blue & girls/red association has been around for 200+ years. The Soviet/Russian official theory is (wiki/source): Обычай перевязывать новорождённых мальчиков голубой лентой, а новорождённых девочек красной восходит к вышеупомянутому указу Павла I награждать каждого родившегося великого князя при крещении орденом Святого Андрея ...


19

Is the dress black and blue in colour? TL:DR; Colour-Constancy illusion. The dress in real life Yes. The original dress is black and blue. The dress has been identified and there are many professional photographs which show its colours unambiguously. See reports referenced below. The dress in the photograph The photograph being circulated is a very ...


17

As pointed out in the comments, we have to distinguish two different concepts when talking about the relation between sex/gender and colors: the ability to assign different names to different shades (color naming) and the ability to perceptually distinguish shades with different physical attributes (color discrimination). There are several studies that ...


15

This addresses the second claim. There are 4 types of photoreceptive neurons in your eye. One is the rod, which is sensitive to green but creates a black/white percept (for "scotopic" or night-adjusted vision) and the other 3 are cones with various types of rhodopsin, a receptor that is sensitive to photons. In a normal, unmutated (non-colorblind) person, ...


11

The claim at Quora is close to the mark, although not exactly for the reason claimed. All lenses (including our eyes) suffer from chromatic aberration, a kind of distortion that occurs because different colors have different refractive indexes. In photographs, this distortion results in fringes of color in high-contrast areas. In eyesight, it can increase ...


9

Chromotherapy is basically bunk. It's major tenets involve aligning chakras with various wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation (e.g., different colored lights). Conversely, there is a reasonable amount of evidence indicating that colors do effect mood in various ways and can be used to prime people. There have been a lot of studies regarding consumer ...


8

Concerning the second claim, the differences seem to be cultural/linguistic, not genetic according to this article from the American Psychological Association: The study tracked color naming, comprehension and memory in two populations over three years. Researchers led by Debi Roberson, PhD, of the University of Essex, compared young English children with ...


7

I'm not convinced the 2012 W3C symposium paper is interpreted properly. Here's a quote from a 2015 paper by the same authors (Rello & Baeza-Yates): This paper presents the following main contributions: [stuff about font size etc., then] – Black text on white background instead of using grey scales for the text is significantly preferred by ...


7

Specifically regarding women having two copies of the X chromosome, there have been a very small number of cases where women have been confirmed as "tetrachromatic" - that is, their two X chromosomes produce different versions of the red and green cones, resulting in sensitivity to four different colors, rather than the usual three. However, it seems likely ...


7

This is indeed an interesting question so I'll attempt to answer it. Many articles posted on the internet claim that the color red makes you hungry, and they claim that junk food giants (like KFC) use this color in their logos, those articles include: Examiner.com, Ask.com, Huffingtonpost.ca, Azscience.org, Dailyinfographic.org, wikispaces.com, rustrybee....


6

In this paper published on orthomolecular.org, the researchers covered a county jail strip search room in pink color. To quote from the abstract: Overall, little or no difference was found in incident rate for the pre- and post-pink months. The initial decline is seen as an intrinsically interesting artifact of the intervention, itself indicative ...


5

Summary: complete colour blindness is very rare (less than 0.01%). What's common is deficiency in red-green colour vision in men, which is around 8% (sex-linked because it's from an X-chromosome fault). This is based on a huge amount of evidence from accurate, widespread diagnostic testing. You're unlikely to notice it in another person through normal ...


5

I found the following words in the Latin dictionary at http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/ caesĭtĭus (-cĭus ), a, um, adj. id., I. [select] bluish, dark blue: “linteolum,” Plaut. Ep 2, 2, 46; cf. Doed. Syn. III. p. 17. cūmātĭlis (cȳm- ), e, adj. from κῦμα, with the Lat. ending ilis. I. Adj., of the waves: “deus,” i. e. Neptune, Commod. 10, 1.— B. Esp., ...


4

To clarify, I see four claims you are skeptical about: Ancient people literally were not able to perceive the color blue. The linked article states: Greeks lived in a murky and muddy world, devoid of color, mostly black and white and metallic, with occasional flashes of red or yellow. Gladstone thought this was perhaps something unique to ...


3

I recalled hearing that the U.S. Coast Guard had studied this, in an effort to determine the best colors for life rafts, to make them more likely to be seen by the spotters aboard SAR aircraft. I could not find that study, but I did find a similar, older one by the U.S. Navy. I did not feel like reading the whole thing, so I skipped to the conclusion on ...


3

Lapis lazuli is a blue semi-precious stone that was mined in Mesopotamia in ancient times as early as the 7th millenium BC, see http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=P_Ixuott4doC&pg=PA86&dq=Lapis+lazuli+++mines+in+the+Badakhshan&hl=en&ei=sW6_TvWKBIKr8AOTn623BA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&sqi=2&ved=...


3

Red seems to have some effect on performance in well constructed experiments and in sport, though we could do with further studies The trouble with many studies on the relationship between colour and performance is that they are based on speculative theories and rely on poorly controlled experiments. This is summed up by the authors of this paper in the ...


2

This was a hot topic for some time in the late 1960's and early 1970's I think, with academic books like "The Luscher Color Test" (Luscher & Scott, 1971) being published. The Luscher Color Test being a personality test based entirely on color preference. This is probably what current online personality tests that use color preference are based on, but ...


2

Color theorists suspect that many color associations emerge from evolutionary ingrained responses to color stimuli (Mollon, 1989 http://jeb.biologists.org/content/146/1/21.full.pdf). Research indicates that colors often serve a signal function for nonhuman animals (e.g., the redness of fruit signals readiness for eating), thereby facilitating fitness-...


2

There are two parts to this book's statement: 1) That nights with a full moon are colder [than those without] 2) That cold temperature increases hydrogen peroxide formation in dew. For the first part, this stack exchange page addresses the issue of the moon's affect on the weather (summary: negligible): https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/83574/...


1

In an episode of QI (youtube) they address this, their website I will quote below: Until the 20th century toddlers of either sex were normally dressed in white, but when colours were used, boys were dressed in pink. At the turn of the 20th century, Dressmaker Magazine wrote: 'The preferred colour to dress young boys in is pink. Blue is reserved for girls ...


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