33

The study seems unreliable to me but they do claim that. For working hours up to around 25 hours a week, an increase in working hours has a positive impact on cognitive functioning. However, when working hours exceed 25 hours per week, an increase in working hours has a negative impact on cognition. However, I question the study's reliability The copy ...


25

The Scientific Consensus: No evidence they reduce cognitive decline In October 2014, a consensus statement was produced that rejected the key claims about brain games. The list of signatories include Susanne Jaeggi, Michael Kane, Randy Engle, Hal Pashler and a number of other people who can be considered eminent in this field (and who you'll find cited ...


20

Sensory Deprivation Apparently if you block or disrupt any of the senses for long enough it can cause hallucinations. So the answer would be yes for some people hallucinations are a possibility. Your question reminded me of floatation tanks, otherwise known as isolation chambers, where you float yourself in highly concentrated saltwater in a light and ...


10

It seems unlikely that there is any basis to this claim. See this question and the answer and comments posted on psychology.stackexchange.com. While there are, according to @Fizz, CT devices for larger animals such as horses, CT cannot be used for functional imaging of the brain. The maximum mass that can be put onto the stretcher of the CT device is given ...


8

Yes, though the improvement is not direct, not large, and not just from classical music. Listening to any emotionally positive music has been shown to improve a subject's mood, which in turn has been shown to improve cognitive abilities. Furthermore, although positive effects on certain tasks have been observed, the effects appear to be quite small overall....


8

Regarding the person you mentioned, there's another article (Mail) explaining her experience with Usher Syndrome in detail (kudos to comment from Johnny): She explains: 'My hearing aids gave me some sense of the environment around me. I could recognise when someone started talking, like an indistinct noise, but I had to lip-read to understand what they ...


8

Positive thinking does have effects, but they're not necessarily positive, according to Professor Richard Wiseman. http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2012/jun/30/self-help-positive-thinking In one study led by Lien Pham at the University of California, students were asked to spend a few moments each day visualising themselves getting a high grade in an ...


7

It depends what you mean by communication skills but at least on the level of testable verbal skills the average physics student far outstrips the average psychology or sociology student. Overall there's a positive correlation, if you're good at math you're more rather than less likely to be good with words. If you're good with words you're more rather ...


6

The basic answer is that aphantasia is very real and is recognised and researched. It's just that not everything that is real can be tested directly. There are some studies that have been done, but it is inherently difficult to study what happens inside a person's mind. This study reported that the participants occasionally had involuntary images in their ...


6

The book cited makes a similar, but not as-strong, claim based on a scientific article which does not support it Both articles cite a book by Trevor Blake, Three Simple Steps: A Map to Success in Business and Life. I've looked up the chapter in question and here is what it says: I've tracked down (I believe) the original article. It does not support the ...


6

There is a least one article written by someone who enjoyed their time in the Orfield anechoic chamber. He mentioned that the human body itself produces a substantial amount of noise (heart beating, lungs breathing, digestive tract rumbling), and the absolute quiet of the chamber highlights these sounds. The Guardian - Experience the quietest place on ...


6

Although I cannot find a legitimate source for that 8-point plan, there are a couple of key points in the information you have shared: The citation that you mentioned above is not a professional/valid citation. The bibliography of that book (which should have expanded information) just says: Duke University, Sociological Study, "Peace of Mind" Any ...


3

See How Language Shapes Thought Scientific American (February 2011), vol. 304, pages 62-65, and the reference cited therein: Unlike English, the Kuuk Thaayorre language spoken in Pormpuraaw does not use relative spatial terms such as left and right. Rather Kuuk Thaayorre speakers talk in terms of absolute cardinal directions (north, south, east, west, and ...


3

It's OK to cite a figure around 30% if we want to indicate the "effect size". A figure of 75% is only correct to indicate the percentage of population affected by this bias. However care should be taken because there are moderating variables that can easily negate the effect, and thus the effect should not be cited as general rule. Full discussion Asch's ...


3

An (small) experiment about correlation between orthographic and logical-mathematical skills was made on 10-year-old children in 2013. The 60 children studied were finally divided in 3 groups: "standard" children that succeeded in most tests in both dommains, children having written language difficulties, children followed for logical difficulties. ...


2

Sugar plays a role too, but the personality traits are more important. Sugar can induce reward and craving that are comparable in magnitude to those induced by addictive drugs. The neural substrates of sugar and sweet reward appear to be more robust than those of cocaine. Although this evidence is limited by the inherent difficulty of comparing different ...


2

This is the part of the book about stressors and brain damage: The effects of fear are important to understand if you want to get out of the quicksand. As soon as you feel fear, the amygdala (a small almond-shaped organ in the center of your brain) sends signals to your autonomic nervous system, which then has a wide range of effects. Your heart rate ...


2

"[I]f an experienced individual has already learned the component motor skills of a physical task, then mental practice may be sufficient to enhance performance without additional physical practice and feedback." This is pretty much what is being said in the video (starting at 15:00). More from the study quoted above: A meta-analysis of the literature ...


2

For the first part of the question, yes the original paper by Sasser et al. (1979) attributes it to a well known hotel group without the mention of the name with reference to several papers such as this, this and this. The natural tendency of people to check their personal appearance substantially reduced complaints, although the actual wait for the ...


1

They've done MRI's to show different levels of brain activity: Aphantasia: Losing the mind’s eye Since I have aphantasia I would qualify this as a real thing. The problem is until we get more brain scans, and studies completed, any explanation will sound very semantic. Whole terms need to be redefined. 'Imagine yourself on the beach' has nothing to do ...


1

The talk says that "10,000 hours" is, to within an order of magnitude, the amount of practice required to get expert-level performance: e.g. to be a professional athlete. It says that, conversely, with a bit of practice you can get really good, really quickly. The following is, I think, an example of the truth of that: Those who pass their driving test ...


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