Hot answers tagged

105

Yes, caffeine intake can reduce blood flow to the brain, but not likely by 45-52% after a small cup of coffee. Summary In studies, they observed a dose-response relationship between caffeine and a drop in cerebral blood flow (usually by 20-30% after 250 mg caffeine, which is ~2 cups of coffee) with greater sensitivity among caffeine-naïve subjects compared ...


21

Q: Does a small cup of coffee result in a 45% reduced blood flow to the brain? tl;dr NO! this means, yes, sure, while there is a significant decrease in measured cerebral blood flow, this is not nearly in the range claimed and surely not for the dosage claimed. this is not something to be concerned about. For several reasons. One is that this effect is ...


18

Quite the opposite, actually. Avoid putting coffee grounds down the garbage disposal. They won't harm the garbage disposal and they'll actually help eliminate odors. However, they can accumulate in drains and pipes, causing clogs. Best to avoid. Garbate Disposal Do's and Don'ts Despite the old wives’ tale that coffee grounds down the sink each day is “...


11

There is no convincing evidence that consumption of caffeine or tea leads to dehydration (fluid loss) based on available research. Studies cited below indicate (a) that caffeine is a not a very efficient diuretic, (b) that coffee/tea's diuretic effects are similar to that of water and (c) that moderate caffeine consumption does not lead to dehydration. The ...


10

In most studies, caffeine intake was associated with no significant weight change or a slight weight loss. Caffeine - no weight change 1) Caffeinated Coffee Does Not Acutely Affect Energy Intake, Appetite, or Inflammation but Prevents Serum Cortisol Concentrations from Falling in Healthy Men (The Journal of Nutrition, 2011) Sixteen apparently healthy, ...


10

Yes it does, and there is plenty of evidence to support this fact. A ~240mL (8 oz) cup of coffee has ~150 mg caffeine (from WolframAlpha) In a recent review of 41 studies, Ruxton (2008) finds consistent evidence that doses of coffee less than and equal to what might be found in a cup of coffee provide "improvements in physical endurance, cognitive ...


10

There have been reported cases of coffee grounds blocking drains: Morrisons cafe shut as coffee grounds block drain, By Claire French, April 12, 2012 A DRAIN blocked up with coffee grounds led to the closure of a supermarket cafe in Reigate for a day while the problem was sorted out. The cafe at Morrisons in Bell Street was voluntarily shut ...


9

No, there isn't a high level of dioxin in Vietnamese coffee, because dioxin does not accumulate sighificantly in plants. See INTAKE OF DIOXINS AND RELATED COMPOUNDS FROM FOOD IN THE U.S. POPULATION, which shows dramaticly lower levels of dioxin in plant-derived foods compare to meat (including fish), eggs and milk. PCDDs and PCDFs previously have been ...


9

The only things I could find that seemed legitimate and not from forum posts about this was from these Livestrong articles. From the first article... Before people learned to brew coffee as a beverage, they ate coffee beans to get a boost of energy for hunts or while farming. Eating coffee beans has the same effects as drinking coffee. However, the ...


8

I could not find any academic studies on this topic, but there is a good discussion of grinders in November 1, 2001 issue of Cook's Illustrated. Cook's Illustrated is not science, but they do provide empirically-based and often experimentally-informed opinions (in contrast with other cooking / kitchen equipment review outfits). According to Cook's: The ...


8

Yes There seem to be a lot of scientific literature around this question. If you agree that higher productivity at work should be a consequence of higher concentration, we have a lot of evidences. A. Smith: Effects of caffeine on human behavior The paper provides us with an extensive literature review of the past researches done on the effects of caffeine....


7

The spoon's conductivity would only heat the coffee if you were holding the spoon with a super-hot hand. Assuming the spoon (and your hand) are both cooler than the coffee, they will both conduct heat away from the liquid, causing the coffee to cool a teensy bit more quickly. Stirring the liquid should logically only speed the process. Believe it or not, a ...


7

There is some evidence that refrigeration can help preserve aromas K. MARIN et al.: New Aroma Index for Aroma Quality of Coffee During Storage, Food Technol. Biotechnol. ISSN 1330-9862 (FTB-1827) The samples stored in a refrigerator preserved their aroma for a longer time, with decreased staling rate ... For consumers, an alternative to ...


7

The short answer is yes. I posted this question because I came across a scientific research exactly answering the question: Toshimitsu Tokimoto, Naohito Kawasaki, Takeo Nakamura, Jyunichi Akutagawa, Seiki Tanada. "Removal of Lead Ions in Drinking Water by Coffee Grounds as Vegetable Biomass." Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 281.1 (2005): 56-61. ...


5

Yes, there are testimonials that Kopi Luwak has a distinct flavor, at least to the trained palette of coffee enthusiasts. However, there seems little consensus that it's a particularly good coffee. One cupper says: The kopi luwak was again smooth and silky with deep chocolate notes and a pleasant earthiness to it. The Honduran was vibrant and citrusy, ...


5

Caffeine on insects That "caffeine kills insects" is an old myth: "I find it considerably interesting and even amusing," said Bussey Professor of Biology Carroll M. Williams. "Caffeine may be an insecticide, but it is not a very powerful agent." The study also determined that caffeine combined with other insecticides increases their killing power. ...


4

The Recommended Dietary Allowance for magnesium for adult males is 400 mg (Office of Dietary Supplements at NIH.gov). One cup of coffee has 10 mg of magnesium (USDA.gov), which does not really make it a good source. In some papers, they are claims like: ...Mg levels are decreased by excess ethanol, salt, phosphoric acid (sodas) and coffee intake...(...


4

The Wikipedia page seems to be incorrect. According to the Specialty Coffee Association of America's website, the ideal brewing temperature for "golden cup" standard coffee is 200°F +- 5°F (93°C +- 3°C). The PDF of this standard lists this, as well as the coffee/water ration and timing. I can see 2 provisos in this. First, the temperature given is the ...


4

Yes, there is a strong association between drinking coffee and reduced Alzheimer's risk. A quantitative review of the data was published in 2007 that looked at the pooled data from four studies, published between 1990 and 2002. Quintana, José Luis Barranco; Allam, Mohamed Farouk; Del Castillo, Amparo Serrano; Navajas, Rafael Fernández-Crehuet, Alzheimer's ...


3

There are a few studies that suggest that drinking coffee is just a placebo effect or the reversal of caffeine withdrawl. Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology Frequent coffee drinkers develop a tolerance to both the anxiety-producing effects and the stimulatory effects of caffeine. While frequent consumers may feel alerted by coffee, evidence suggests ...


2

Disclaimer - I claim no expertise what so ever in nutrition and health. Do not take my statement as fact, do your own research Mainstream opinion seems to be that high intake of antioxidants are one big component for longevity. And coffee, according to some studies, is a powerful antioxidant. A thought experiment: Two subjects 'A' and 'B' Subject 'A' ...


2

Well, the original study is behind a paywall, however from the abstract we can easily deduce that the incidence of toxins is only 33% and in those cases, it's within the EU safety limits. In other words, there's nothing to worry about: you need a certain minimum concentration of mycotoxins before you can experience any effect. Twenty samples (33.3%) of ...


2

Here is one 2004 study about antioxidants intake in Norwegian adults, because I believe the question is more about coffee than the United States, right?: "The intake of coffee contributed approximately 11.1 mmol, followed by fruits (1.8 mmol), tea (1.4 mmol), wine (0.8 mmol), cereals (i.e., all grain containing foods; 0.8 mmol), and vegetables (0.4 mmol)......


2

According to Dr Joe Vinson, yes, or at least it was in 2005. I can't find an online text of the study, but it's reported/recapped in many places. I haven't seen a newer study that directly measures antioxidants in the US diet. Dr Vinson measured in milligrams the top 10 sources of antioxidants consumed on average in the US diet. Coffee was far and away ...


2

Well, BPA is classified by the IARC as group 3 carcinogen - Not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans. It is still less probably harmful than cell phone radiation and coffee itself (group 2B). Link to the full list (In my opinion, if there is a problem, the Bisphenol-A is not the problem, but the coffee is.) A 2008 report by the Center for the ...


1

This technique was mentioned in a WCBS-TV report in 2010. Another great use for coffee grounds is as a drain cleaner. Mixed with hot water, coffee grounds can unclog a drain and help keep it smelling fresh. In the refrigerator it makes a great deodorizer because the grounds can absorb odors. The article was passed around the web and eventually onto ...


1

Yes. Per Xuguang Guo et al's 2014 study (Dr Honglei Chen is the part of this research group), "compared to nondrinkers, drinking coffee or tea without any sweetener was associated with a lower risk for depression, adding artificial sweeteners, but not sugar or honey, was associated with higher risks. Frequent consumption of sweetened beverages, especially ...


1

Per meta-analytic studies listed below, there is evidence that coffee drinking is associated with a reduced risk of certain types of cancers Per Allessio Crippa et.al. in 2014, coffee consumption was not associated with cancer mortality and coffee consumption is inversely associated with all cause and CVD mortality. Per Yu X et.al. in 2011, findings from a ...


1

Yes, it would taste different. Comparing "better" or not is irrelevant, since the question asks simply if it is "different." Here is why it's different: What is the difference between blade- and burr-ground coffee? Consistency/uniformity of the grind. It is made up of two revolving abrasive surfaces (called burrs), in between which the coffee is ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible