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66

Yes, that's Andre's hand. This image was part of the cover spread for a biographical article "To the Giant among us" in Sports Illustrated in 1981. The full cover spread includes regular-sized hands pouring a beer for comparison: The full article text for To The Giant Among Us is available on sports illustrated's vault.


54

In 1953, a paper looking at some of the factors involved in beer foam answered this question almost as an incidental aside. Jackson, S. (1953). FACTORS AFFECTING BEER FOAM I. CARBON DIOXIDE EVOLUTION. Journal of the Institute of Brewing, 59(4), 317–322. doi:10.1002/j.2050-0416.1953.tb02723.x The main experiments described monitoring the CO2 emissions of ...


18

Taste is extremely subjective and I couldn't find any rigorous tests scientific literature of blind taste tests. However, that said, unscientific tests such as one by the Huffington Post had the following results for blind bottled vs. canned taste test with 25 tasters: Budweiser - 64 percent identified the canned variety, 17 percent preferred the canned ...


11

Current evidence: Skunky-smelling compounds (3-methylbut-2-ene-1-thiol) are formed in beer due to sunlight breaking down alpha acids in hops (flavoring and stability agent in beer) that react with sulfur. These compounds are chemically similar to the chemical compounds that's found in spray produced by skunks against predators. The bittering agent ...


10

Larry Kudlow said that "plant-based beer" phrase in the middle of a diatribe against liberals'/Biden alleged plan to limit beef consumption and supposedly other animal products. The "plant-based beer" phrase is not commonly heard otherwise and was mocked (on the left) for the fact that beer is mostly plant-based. Having said that, ...


9

Fruit juice and certain bakery products contain a little bit of alcohol. This study found that the type of orange juice they tested contains 0.77 g/L of alcohol, roughly 0.06% ABV. This study tested a variety of orange juices and found .0075%-.09% ABV. This is less than a fifth of the amount claimed in the question.


7

Yes, it is true, the beer is safe to drink if it was closed. As it is would be with any food product, even water. If they were open, both could be contaminated with radioactive material from the air. Things are typically not made radioactive by exposure to electromagnetic radiation, which is the most likely case for your beer, unless it is near ground zero, ...


4

One approach could be to test (hopped) alcohol-free beer. A study looking at this was The Sedative Effect of Non-Alcoholic Beer in Healthy Female Nurses, Franco et al, PLoS One. 2012; 7(7). Among other things, its conclusions were The moderate consumption of non-alcoholic beer will favour night-time rest, due in particular to its hop components, in ...


3

I knew this would work theoretically, but I looked for people actually performing the experiment empirically. To my surprise, I found a carefully performed experiment in a 2014 blog article that concluded: BUSTED! Depending on how you wrap the paper towel it will either have no effect or slow down the cooling of your favorite drink. Here is the killer ...


1

Does wetting a beer glass change the foam characteristics? Yes, it reduces nucleation on the surface of the glass; reducing foaming below the head. Bubbles under the head rise and enter the head altering the size of the bubbles there, larger bubbles in the head pop and drain further reducing the foam on top. See: "Beer - A Quality Perspective", (...


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