25

Yes. Based on [Relationship between surface UV radiation and air pollution in Beijing] from 2008 by An JL1, Wang YS, Li X, Sun Y, Shen SH. This study also shows that a substantial reduction (up to 50%) in the UV radiation on days with high levels of air pollution. Larger fluctuations are found in UV radiation in the summer. The effects of clouds and air ...


18

It is justified with (recent) evidence. Selectively quoting from WP:Pariculates#Health_problems, emphasis of publication dates mine: Inhalation of PM2.5 – PM10 is associated with elevated risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as low birth weight. Sapkota, Amir; Chelikowsky, Adam P.; Nachman, Keeve E.; Cohen, Aaron J.; Ritz, Beate (2012-12-01). "...


15

I am submitting a new answer because I believe there is a gap in understanding in how these regulations work. I will try to be brief, yet thorough. EPA regulates Particulate Matter, or PM, under the authority of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. Specifically, there is a National Ambient Air Quality Standard, or NAAQS, which limits the PM in the ...


12

Disconnect between journal article and the blog post on it The sketchy claim investigated in this question is: “By 2100, the earth at sea level could have atmospheric oxygen levels comparable to the top of Mount Everest today. And as far as I know, people cannot normally stay on Everest without oxygen masks for more than a few minutes,” Petrovskii said. ...


6

Odd. The CASAC also disagreed with the EPA on PM in 2006 - only they felt the restrictions were not protective enough of public health: "The CASAC recommended changes in the annual fine-particle standard because there is clear and convincing scientific evidence that significant adverse human-health effects occur in response to short-term and chronic ...


6

That looks about right. Here is a link to data for global emissions, as well as individual nations, going back to 1990. The global numbers are in the range you cite. Keep in mind the these values are CO2 emissions, not carbon alone. The carbon component is 12/44 of the CO2 mass, or about 27%. So (assuming the Wolfram Alpha numbers are correct), the ...


5

Wolfram Alpha tells me that that mass ≈ 0.35 × estimated mass of all oil produced since 1850 (upper limit) ( 1×10^11 t ) You're forgetting two things here: Oxygen and coal. While there are other sources of this apparent discrepancy, these are the two main sources of your skepticism. Carbon dioxide comprises one molecule of carbon and two of oxygen. By mass,...


4

Before rain hits the ground, it goes through the air and can pick up particles that you don't want to be drinking. How much of an issue this is will depend on where you are. Rain water in urban cities can be pretty bad: In most industrialized urban areas, the atmosphere has often been polluted to such a degree that the rainwater itself is considered ...


4

Untreated rain water from well maintained roofs is generally safe to drink. Consumption of rainwater collected from ground catching systems without treatment is not recommended due to high levels of microbial contamination. Untreated roof runoff has been widely used for drinking purposes for many years with very few reports of serious health problems. ...


1

Was the total CO2 added to the atmosphere in 2011 (or a similar year)? It depends on what you mean by "added to the atmosphere". Skeptical Science says: 29 billion tons produced by human activity (they chose a different year, so doesn't match the 38.2). 439 - 450 = 11 billion tons absorbed by land plants. 332 - 338 = 6 billion tons absorbed by oceans. ...


1

the EPA's restrictions on particulate matter are not supported by evidence This isn't completely true, there is evidence showing particulate matter is harmful for humans. The bulk of this evidence is in the form of Epidemiology studies, looking at human health statistics and comparing to their exposure to PM. The issues the author brings up is that he ...


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