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TL;DR The claimed detection of phosphine is not conclusive evidence of life on Venus; it simply indicates that there are unknown chemical pathways on the planet that are producing it. While these may be biological in nature, they also may not be. Therefore, the discovery might be evidence of life on Venus. Recent work has cast serious doubt on all of this, ...


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The claims are two wrong, one sort of correct Before we start, it might be worth noting though that a strong magnetic field is more likely to keep radiation out than letting it in (*). Anyway, the Earth's magnetic field at the surface, measured in nanotesla, and sourced from here. The image below has the locations in question marked with yellow stars (thank ...


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Any strong claims made by news outlets are journalistic rather than scientific. The linked article is pretty cautious, and reflects the researchers' position rather well. Other stories have gone a little further: Sky News, for example Signs of alien life detected on Venus -- Microbes unlike any life on Earth could be thriving high in the clouds of Venus, ...


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Notably, the body that created the fireball was initially only ~4 meters in diameter with a mass of 200,000 kg prior to atmospheric entry, traveling around 16 km/s (Brown et al. 2000). This is substantially smaller than the object that caused the airburst over Chelyabinsk (see Popova et al. 2015), which I'll discuss later. This mass was reduced prior to the ...


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