21

The author is repeating an old, hoary chestnut from the days of Edward Gibbon about a sudden decline in Roman prosperity after the conversion of the Empire to Christianity. This is basically a false rumor which seemed believable in Gibbon's Age of Enlightenment, but he had to work hard to present any supporting evidence for it, including fabricating the myth ...


17

I think the "...in the Colosseum" part is crucial to the claim. Tacitus' description of Nero's persecution of Christians says: And perishing [Christians] were additionally made into sports: they were killed by dogs by having the hides of beasts attached to them, or they were nailed to crosses or set aflame, and, when the daylight passed away, they were ...


13

The historical record is spotty, but we can pretty confidently say No. In The Divinity of the Roman Emperor (1931) by Lily Ross Taylor, she spends two chapters encyclopedically listing the growing adulation and pomp surrounding Julius Caesar before and after death. Ch. iii ends As a matter of fact, Caesar was probably too far past the romantic glamor of ...


9

It depends on the time frame involved, and it is generally accepted that initially most of the gladiators that competed were slaves by virtue of being prisoners of war, criminals, or slaves bought for the proposes of being sent a gladiatorial school. However, it is estimated that by the end of the Republic that about half of the gladiators were free men that ...


9

Martyrs were honoured from earliest times, and Christian tradition certainly says that some notable Christians sought out and hoped for martyrdom. While some of these tales seem fanciful, no doubt others did seek out the honour of martyrdom and the glory they hoped for in the next life. Alvar Ellegard says, in Jesus One Hundred Years Before Christ, page 202,...


6

The author of the Answers in Genesis article is likely incorrect. Tiberius officially was solely Roman emperor in A.D. 14. However, to quote Garret G. Fagan, a history professor at Penn State: From A.D. 4 to 14 Tiberius was clearly Augustus's successor. When he was adopted, he also received grants of proconsular power and tribunician power; and in A.D. 13 ...


5

This paper seems to suggest that the Romans didn't have a specific term for glacier, but their travel writers did describe things that are plausibly glaciers. This would imply that the claim "Nowhere in the detailed travel accounts from Roman times are glaciers mentioned." is ill-informed if not actually factually incorrect. This also implies that we can't ...


4

Partially. The locations of Roman roads are still linked to higher prosperity today within Europe, but not the Middle East and Northern Africa (MENA). This would be expected, if the usage of these roads contributed to today's prosperity. While MENA also had Roman roads, wheel-based transport was abandoned in the early middle ages in MENA - likely because ...


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