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188

The answer seems to be no on all accounts. In general, Snopes says: Although the meme is of recent origin, Internet mentions of this alleged historical fact date to at least 2003. Significantly, however, we were unable to trace it back any further than that, nor could we find any credible support for the general claim that it was common to use ammunition ...


42

A more recent study (also published by the CDC) seems to indicate that 30% might be a good enough concentration against SARS-CoV-2: [Figure legend:] Effect of commercially available alcohols in inactivating SARS-CoV-2. The means of 3 independent experiments with SDs (error bars) are shown. A) Results for ethanol. B) Results for 2-propanol. Dark gray bar ...


32

The Primary Chronicle is the only written document we have of the early Kievan Rus, and is the primary text used by scholars of early Russian history to understand the founding of the Russian state, and more particularly, the history of the early Varangian dynasty. The specific quote often cited from the story of Vladimir is “Drinking is the Joy of the Rus, ...


29

No, it is highly implausible that eating yeast will stop you from getting drunk. Inside the stomach the pH is around 1-2, the activity of enzymes is typically strongly dependent on the pH. Outside of their optimal pH range enzymes generally work much slower or not at all. Yeast ADH has a pH optimum in the neutral to alkaline range, at low pH values it is ...


29

The word "Shot", a corruption of the Late Old-Engish "Scot" or "Secot", itself a corruption of the old Norse "skot", was a word meaning a Tax or measure. This means it pre-dates not just the "Wild West" period of American history, but also the invention of the first firearms. A cannon used to fire either a large Cannonball or a measure ("shot") of smaller ...


23

Baker's yeast is capable of fermentation, so it can certainly produce alcohol. In 1926 it was reported in the Canadian Medical Association Journal that bread can contain between 0.04 and 1.9% of alcohol. This is just a short report, not a full scientific paper. In "Ethanol Content of Various Foods and Soft Drinks and their Potential for Interference with ...


23

No, when she said "Not at all" she was answering the question: Do you recall prior to getting there — so I’m — I’m only talking about up to the gathering — had you had anything to drink? According to a full transcript.


19

CDC The CDC website has a nice summary of our current knowledge on the matter. Dangers of Mixing Alcohol and Energy Drinks Energy drinks are beverages that typically contain caffeine, other plant-based stimulants, simple sugars, and other additives. They are very popular among youth and are regularly consumed by 31% of 12- to 17-year-olds and 34% of 18- to ...


18

The main harm from ingestion of alcohol in cold weather is the risk of hypothermia. Alcohol is known to affect body temperature during cold weather as well as hot weather. Drinking alcohol may decrease one's core body temperature regardless of the outside temperature and might increase hypothermia risk. Alcohol ingestion increases the risk of acquiring ...


17

It is true that bacteria can't become resistant to ethanol to our current knowledge, but the cited reason doesn't sound plausible to me. According to "Epidemiologic background of hand hygiene and evaluation of the most important agents for scrubs and rubs." published in Clinical Microbiology Reviews in 2004: No acquired resistance to ethanol, isopropanol,...


17

No. A probiotic food, as defined by the dictionaries (1) (2) (3) must contain benefical live bacteria (regarding the human organism). Scientific literature calls those bacteria probiotic (4). Tequila does not contain these benefical live bacteria, as its alcohol concentration would at least atenuate them if not outright kill (lactobacilli are more fragile ...


15

No. Unless the weekend is redefined to cover a few quiet hours on friday and saturday night. The sensational newspaper headlines are based on a relatively reliable piece of research which is consistent with previous research done both in the UK and in some other countries. The language used in the research paper and the way data is presented somewhat ...


14

A depressant slows down the Central Nervous System. Example: alcohol. A stimulant speeds up the Central Nervous System. Example: nicotine. Tequila contains alcohol, so logically it should be classified as a depressant... but, there goes a famous claim saying that: Unlike other forms of alcohol, tequila is not a depressant. In other words, it says that ...


12

Alcohol may in fact make radiation poisoning worse. Though red wine specifically may give a slight boost that can be further improved by removing the alcohol entirely. according to this study: Consumption of dealcoholised red wine significantly decreased the gamma radiation-induced DNA damage at 1 and 2 h post-consumption by 20%. In contrast alcohol ...


11

I've written about this for years. A new CU analysis slices non-drinkers-now by past-heavy-drinking vs. not, and finds that the never-heavy-drinking non-drinkers are equally healthy to light-drinkers-now. This doesn't exactly seem fair given that they don't slice light-drinkers-now in the same way (so they don't really prove absence of benefit from light ...


11

It seems decidedly skepticism-worthy based on the previous answers. I do not know the science, but I did find a link to a patent filing for the Prequel product filed by Joseph Owades, who also appears to be a legitimate scientific source as an industrial biochemist and Ph.D. Quotes are included in comments below. http://patents.justia.com/patent/6284244 ...


11

The article author of the article that you linked to wrote an earlier article in 1994 where he measured the ethanol content of unspoiled honey. This article of Journal of Agricultural Food Chem from 1994 gives the natural ethanol content of honey as 27.9mg/kg.


11

The caption is not true, but it's a real photo -- of a prototype. Actual caption: "At the Second Automatic Vending Exhibition in London, a woman helps herself to a vending machine-mixed whisky and soda. February 15, 1960" There's also a photo of a beer vending machine taken in that era. As my Google Scholar search for "alcohol vending machine" came up ...


11

It is not that our body "focuses" on alcohol but alcohol being a liquid gets absorbed and metabolized quickly (or first in relation to your question), whereas food needs to be broken down first into pieces by our teeth, then it mixes with saliva and then undergoes digestion in stomach and this process of breaking down of solid food to small absorbable ...


11

I tried to follow the trail, but was unsuccessful. In 1994, an (not peer-reviewed) letter by was published in the British Medical Journal by G Winstanley (representing an organisation that represents a number of UK drinks producers). It claimed: In 1979 a special committee of the Royal College of Psychiatrists stated that the absolute upper weekly limit ...


10

The answer seems to be probably yes. Rats were given ethanol to a level consistent with human levels that would cause intoxication [1] Bleeding time and blood loss were increased 1 h after ethanol administration, regardless of the utilized technique. The Framingham Offspring Study looked at platelet function in 1-2k subjects, and found Alcohol ...


10

As an additional answer, some kinds of bread are treated with alcohol as a preservative. For example Italian pancarré (sliced sandwich bread) is very commonly laced with ethanol. Ingredients Type "0" wheat flour, water, lard (4.2%), dextrose (3.4%), salt, yeast, wheat malt extract. (Treated with ethyl alcohol). Manufactured in a facility that also ...


10

No, it's an exaggeration. In 2010, Russian males (aged 15+) consumed an average of 23.9 (Confidence interval 21.1–26.8) liters of pure alcohol annually. Including women brings it down to 15.1 (13.3–16.9) liters.(WHO; pg. 5) (Note that the break-down is 37.6% Beer, 11.4% Wine, and 51.0% Spirits)(same pdf, pg. 13) So, to be generous, even if we only look ...


10

All of this answer is based on what I found on a recent review on the subject of alcohol and breastfeeding Haastrup, M. B., Pottegård, A. & Damkier, P. Alcohol and Breastfeeding. Basic Clin. Pharmacol. Toxicol. 114, 168–173 (2014). First of all, it is interesting to address a common myth that alcohol ingestion can increase milk production and secretion....


9

There are rational ways to assess the harmful effects of legal and illegal drugs and this one classified LSD as much less harmful than alcohol There is a lot of debate about how to classify the harms of legal and illegal drugs. One of the major issues is that there are a variety of different ways that harm can be caused either to the user of the drug or to ...


9

No it isn't, at least in UK in 2010. It's the best data I could find and it will require some calculations. I will try to err in favor of the claim in order to disprove it convincingly. According to the General Lifestyle Survey Overview and in particular the General Lifestyle Survey - Drinking tables 2010 (Excel sheet 609Kb) found here, in particular Table ...


9

No. But for the simple reason that the UK in 1979 did not have a country wide guideline. Yes, in the sense that in 1979 one such guideline was proposed. From that starting point the trend for a constant lowering of these values was to be observed. Most strikingly, individual benefit for any of these guidelines seem to have been a target value of near zero ...


8

Taste is extremely subjective so one persons idea of a good vodka might not be the same as another persons; however, in the United States, vodka is legally defined as, Neutral spirits distilled or treated after distillation with charcoal or other materials so as to be without distinctive character, aroma, taste or color This gives us a fairly unique ...


8

According to the November 1899 Journal of Medicine and Science, Volume 5, at page 440: Deléarde in experimenting with tetanus and anthrax found that animals treated with alcohol after they had been vaccinated, lost their immunity ; if treated with alcohol during the vaccination period, they then acquired immunity with difficulty; if the vaccination was ...


8

In short: No. But it is a bit more complicated than that. It is probably a bad way to phrase it like "The more alcohol a society consumes, the fewer alcohol-related problems and alcohol-related deaths (including cirrhosis) it has, […]" This is likely to be a journalistic creativity that as usual cannot make head or tail of the logic of an argument. If you ...


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