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15

Here's something nobody ever seems to ask: What's the alternative? Surely we aren't picturing a pastureland that would have been paved over with asphalt, if not for this heroic rancher? Certainly in a "natural" state, something would be growing there, and of course that would mean something else would be there eating it. Without human intervention, most ...


5

First, it's important to mention that not all carbon is created equal. That is, some greenhouse gases are much worse than others. But in the interest of the claim, let's look at carbon, only.* With that out of the way, we should also specify what a meaningful definition of "carbon emission" is. The infographic directly equates emissions from cattle, ...


2

The way the answer is put no, not at all. There are lots of metrics above so I won't repeat anything. But I will state the obvious: The pasture land will sequester carbon regardless of the operation of the farm. It is not a mandatory part of the farm cycle from this perspective. So the farm itself has a carbon emission cost and carbon sequester from the ...


93

No. This is not really an infographic that is truthful. It is 'anecdotal evidence' evidence for one farm, very probably not true for that very farm, and in any case a misleading oversimplification. Pasture land can sequester some carbon, yes, but how meaningful is that? Carbon is just the element, and the element is not a greenhouse gas (GHG). Carbon ...


13

Some of it is close to factual data for one particular farm in Nova Scotia. Infographic have been based on calculation from this site https://wild-mountain-farm.myshopify.com/blogs/pasture-connections/11745121-calculating-the-carbon-footprint-of-our-grass-fed-beef The calculation is made with a calculator that is no longer available (or I couldn't find ...


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