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I am referring to these lines:

A recent study reported that increasing porn use is linked to decreased sexual performance in men and increased sexual performance in women.

Big Think - Is watching pornography bad for men — but good for women?

The researchers found that more frequent porn use was associated with lower sexual performance for men but higher sexual performance for women.

PsyPost - Porn use linked to lower sexual performance for men – but higher sexual performance for women, study finds

This question is about Pornography and the male libido so I am asking about women.

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The relevant research paper doesn't address the question as to whether or not pornography increases sexual performance in women. Sommet and Berent (2022) found a correlation:

In contrast, among women, higher and increasing frequencies of porn use were associated with higher levels of sexual self-competence, improved sexual functioning, and enhanced partner-reported sexual satisfaction (for some aspects).
Porn use and men’s and women’s sexual performance: evidence from a large longitudinal sample; see also this survey data.

The paper doesn't claim that porn does (or doesn't) improve women's sexual performance. In fact, they spend a paragraph warning the reader about the correlation vs. causation problem:

Third, observational data cannot be used to draw causal inferences. However, we believe that causality should be assessed in terms of a ‘continuum of plausibility’ (Dunning, 2008) along which longitudinal evidence is located above cross-sectional evidence (but below experimental evidence; see also Grosz, Rohrer, & Thoemmes, 2020). In our case, given the consistencies between the results from the fixed-effects (focusing on within-participants change) and first-difference (focused on wave-to-wave change) regressions, we believe that causality is at least plausible. That being said, two alternative explanations – which we regard as less parsimonious in the case of a reversed interaction (for a related discussion, see Wright, 2021b) – cannot be formally excluded: (i) the presence of unobserved time-varying confounders (e.g. variations in well-being; see Kohut & Štulhofer, 2018) and (ii) reciprocal effects (e.g. for men, a decrease in sexual self-competence can cause an increase in porn use, and for women, the reverse could be true).

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