5

According to LifeWave, their X39 patch is able to

activate our stem cells and reset them to a younger, healthier state. This would be healing in a completely non-invasive, safe and cost-effective way.

[...] The LifeWave X39™ is clinically proven to provide the body with a level of health and vitality that you have not experienced since you were in your youth.

The product page for the X39 & X45 Performance Bundle claims the X39 patches feature:

  • Patented method designed to elevate a peptide known to enhance stem cell activity
  • Supports relief of minor aches and pains
  • More energy and better sleep
  • Supports natural wound healing process
  • Maintains healthy inflammatory response

The site boasts a science page with several links to articles published in journals regarding their products, including for several acupressure / acupuncture products.

Is this a legit medical product?

6
  • 5
    Is it me, or is "...designed to elevate a peptide known to enhance..." carefully avoiding an actual claim that the product enhances anything?
    – IMSoP
    Jan 6 at 10:53
  • 5
    The text you cited (pre-edit) is missing a final asterisk that does appear on the first page linked as "LifeWave X39™ patches have been demonstrated to provide an abundance of health benefits.*" There is no other asterisk on that page, but right down at the bottom it says Disclaimer: Our patches are based on the theory of phototherapy. The patches are not proven based on conventional medicine standards and should not be used in place of medical care. So that answers your question: "Is this a legit medical product?" - NO. Jan 6 at 17:07
  • @WeatherVane: I edited down the claim, just as you were posting this comment. It wasn't in response to the comment. I am now trying to figure out the best approach. I suspect it is including what you said in an answer?
    – Oddthinking
    Jan 6 at 17:11
  • @Oddthinking I adjusted the comment to suit that, but it does seem to be a case of the OP's linked material answering their own (final) question. Jan 6 at 17:13
  • @WeatherVane: Agreed, but even the disclaimer contains pseudoscientific claims. [Err.. of course, I remain open to evidence on this.] How is a skin patch based on phototherapy!?
    – Oddthinking
    Jan 6 at 17:14
12

The first link in the question is visible to me as

Activate Your Stem Cells

As we age, our stem cells decline in their ability to heal our bodies. Imagine if we could activate our stem cells and reset them to support wellness and health. This would boost vitality in a completely non-invasive, safe and cost-effective way.

We did it!

LifeWave X39™ provides the body with a level of health and vitality that you have not experienced since you were in your youth. Backed by 20 years of development, LifeWave X39™ patches have been demonstrated to provide an abundance of health benefits.*

There is a final asterisk, but a search of the page doesn't reveal a matching asterisked footnote as one might expect. However, right at the bottom of the page, is the following:

Disclaimer: Our patches are based on the theory of phototherapy. The patches are not proven based on conventional medicine standards and should not be used in place of medical care.
© Lifewave 2022


So answer to the OP's final question:

Is this a legit medical product?

must by their own disclaimer, be NO.


Crucially, when I select my country to be 'Philippines' neither the asterisk, nor the footnote disclaimer are present. And the paragraph I reproduced above, instead ends with:

Backed by multiple clinical studies and 20 years of development, the LifeWave X39™ patch has been demonstrated to provide an abundance of health benefits.

(my bolding).

2
  • 4
    So it works great if you happen to be in the Philippines? Jan 6 at 20:54
  • 4
    @plasticinsect I can imagine how a disclaimer might inhibit the efficacy of psychic surgery too. Jan 6 at 22:59

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .