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A couple of days ago, a Scottish tabloid reported that a man managed to capture Nessie on a video captured by a drone that was recording his kayaking adventures.

In the original video on Youtube, now removed by its creator, there seems to be some sort of underwater object rising into visibility below the surface of the water, but what is it? From the context of the rest of the video, I doubt that it was a deliberate hoax; the author of the video claims not to have noticed it until after the video was uploaded and the commenters of the video pointed it out.

Since there have been numerous studies debunking the existence of Nessie, I doubt that it's any sort of large unknown animal, but what could it be?

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    "I doubt that it was a deliberate hoax; the author of the video claims not to have noticed it until after the video was uploaded and the commenters of the video pointed it out." Be careful when using the claims of the claimant about their own evidence as evidence.
    – Schwern
    Sep 26 at 17:41
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    Support against it being a deliberate hoax, but not support of it being authentic, is that this is a well established channel and part of a much longer video which has no context for monster hunting.
    – Schwern
    Sep 26 at 17:46
  • OP: Please don't accept answers so quickly. Stack Exchange encourages you to wait at least 24 hours before accepting, and with skeptics, you may wait longer so that people can research their answers. Sep 27 at 15:44
  • It looks more like a mat of seaweed to me than anything. I missed it the first pass or two because I wasn't expecting something large to be in those shallow waters. Sep 28 at 15:41
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    The youtube video has been taken down by the creator. You probably can remove the link then.
    – bibleblade
    Sep 29 at 9:23
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It seems unlikely to me that this particular "sighting" will be addressed by experts (if one can even be an expert here), though evidence and such from other incidents may be relevant:

That dark, humped "creature" [in Lake Champlain] was revealed to be a submerged tree trunk briefly brought to the surface by buoyant gases created during decomposition. This is a well-known hydrological phenomenon that has created false lake monster sightings before (the process is similar to why plastic drinking straws rise in carbonated drinks). The only thing that made the Mansi photo unique, mysterious and famous was that it resembled a dinosaur-like head and hump from one angle. — Live Science

Also:

The SKEPTICAL INQUIRER asked Charles J. Cazeau, professor of geology at SUNY-Buffalo and coauthor of Exploring the Unknown, to examine the Searle photos and comment on them. Here is an excerpt from his response: "Most damning of their authenticity as 'monster' photos is, upon close examination, the lack of any indication of water disturbance around the 'monster.' A large animate creature (as was the plesiosaur, for instance) would be likely to be in motion and to leave a wake of some kind. This creature is hanging dead in the water (like a tree trunk). . . . In my field days as a geologist, I saw many old, curvaceous tree-trunks floating motionless in the water that could quite easily be perceived as some kind of monstrous creature. Figures 4 and 5 show something that is not only dead in the water but also slowly rotating. I would lend my support to the tree-trunk theory."

I can't say I'm an expert (though I've definitely seen more trees than anyone has even seen alleged water monsters), but what's in the video looks like a slowly drifting tree trunk in a forest.

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    A large animal nearly beaching itself on shore and nobody on shore noticed? It's at least as long as two canoes, over 30 feet.
    – Schwern
    Sep 26 at 17:44

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