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According to The Benefits of Laughing Pig Oil, an Indonesian language article, lard is very healthy. The article is spreading through many social groups. It seems that the article spreads well among Chinese Indonesians because they eat pork, while their fellow Muslims do not.

So pork is one of the things that "bind" Chinese together in Indonesia.

Some Muslims are angry because the article contains rumors that vaccines use pork as one of the ingredients. They argued that it makes many Muslims avoid vaccines and that that's then dangerous for health (this one, is a very reasonable concern).

It spreads among Chinese in Indonesia that lard is good for health. It is claimed to reduce heart disease, and many other things.

I tried to find an English version of the claim but can't find any.

Are the claims made in that article true? Does lard have health benefits?

closed as unclear what you're asking by Oddthinking Mar 1 '18 at 17:49

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    I think the whole paragraph about vaccines, pork ingredients therein, and religious taboo is not relevant to the question...? – DevSolar Feb 28 '18 at 13:03
  • Have you read the plethora of articles you get for the keywords "lard" and "health", going into relative contents of saturated vs. unsaturated fats, vitamin D content, impact on cholesterol levels etc.? The gist there is, it's not as bad as it's rep used to be, perhaps better than other kitchen fats, but in the end, it's still fat? – DevSolar Feb 28 '18 at 13:09
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    @LangLangC: I was trying to establish whether the OP was just too lazy to do own research, or is looking for something specific not covered by the trivially available sources. No need to be snarky about it. – DevSolar Feb 28 '18 at 13:18
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    @LangLangC: No offense taken. Nutrition advice is also full of opinion, with no two authors agreeing on much... Whether you consider the relative contents of saturated / unsaturated fats or the vitamin D content to be more beneficial than, say, not using fats in your kitchen, for example. That's why I'd prefer a more to-the-point question... – DevSolar Feb 28 '18 at 13:29
  • I think, in particular, I am asking if that particular article is right or wrong – user4951 Feb 28 '18 at 14:38
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There are lots of articles available that go into the details of relative contents of saturated vs. unsaturated fats, vitamin D content, impact on cholesterol levels etc. of lard when compared to other cooking fats (like olive oil, sunflower oil, butter, margarine).

The gist there is, it's not as bad as it's rep used to be, perhaps (!) better than other kitchen fats, but in the end, it's still fat. Whether it's better to switch to lard as cooking fat, or avoid cooking fats altogether, is subject to contention.

Nutrition advice in general is full of opinion, with no two authors agreeing on much. So you probably won't get a "real" answer to this.

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