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In physiology books (Medical Physiology - Guyton and Hall) one studies that according to renal capacity features, some desert animals are capable of drinking seawater. Is this also true in practice? Or is this just a theory?

However, a shipwreck victim’s pet Australian hopping mouse could drink with impunity all the seawater it wanted. 

closed as unclear what you're asking by Oddthinking Jul 20 '17 at 13:27

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    animal is a pretty wide classification, fish are animals and I would guess that sea fish can drink sea water. – daniel Jul 20 '17 at 8:14
  • if you just wanted an answer, yes - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_turtle – daniel Jul 20 '17 at 8:22
  • Actually it says the opposite: they cant drink sea water according to renal features – gurghet Jul 20 '17 at 8:24
  • Are we reading in the same language? "Hatchlings depend on drinking sea water immediately upon entering the ocean" your question could be tightened up you asked "can animals drink seawater" my answer is "yes" , i do note that "reptilian kidneys cannot produce urine with a higher ion concentration than sea water" so they rely on crying out the salt – daniel Jul 20 '17 at 8:32
  • Crying out the salt? They have salt glands. Anyways read my question again: it says "according to renal capacity features, some animals are capable of drinking seawater" this is not the case as, according to their renal concentration capacity: they can't – gurghet Jul 20 '17 at 8:36

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