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Is the photo captioned, a Turkish official taunting starving Armenians with bread" fake?

Picture

I believe the picture is most recently use in The Great Game of Genocide Imperialism, Nationalism, and the Destruction of the Ottoman Armenians, by Donald Bloxham.

This forgery claim is stated here, and here. However, I'm seeing this said about the picture...

This photograph purports to be an Ottoman [sic.] official taunting starving Armenians with bread. It is a fake, combining elements of two (or more) separate photographs: a demonstration were one needed of the propaganda stakes on both sides of the genocide issue with evidence of all sorts manipulated for latterday political purposes. The photograph was also included when the book was first published but then was believed to be genuine. It had previously been used in Gérard Chaliand and Yves Ternon's Le Genocide des Arméniens (1980), which shows that prior use is no substitute for rigorous investigation of a picture's provenance – and in the absence of clear provenance, for a minutely detailed examination of the picture itself. It is a cautionary tale for historians, many of whom are better trained in testing and using written sources than in evaluating photographic evidence. The publishers and author are grateful to have had the forgery drawn to their attention'.

But I don't see any notice of the redaction on the Oxford University store nor in the copies available.

Every version of the story comes with a similar claim about the pixels, and a similar admission -- is the photo fake?

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It seems it was faked. He's missing a leg and an arm and everyone else has stretched arms.

Further, while not on either of those blog posts this very infamous picture is exhaustively talked about and analyzed in The Saga Surrounding a Forged Photograph from the Era of the Armenian Genocide Demonizing and Vilifying a 'Cruel Turkish Official': A part of `the rest of the story. There they actually identify the backdrop having been hijacked from La Famine au Liban.

Background

Also proposed in the above is the Lebanese woman pictured in the hijab, from a different angle in the same source book.

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    So this is a case of ancient photoshopping. This is really interesting! – T. Sar Apr 27 '17 at 12:37
  • @TSar I wonder if it was the French Intelligence. – Evan Carroll Apr 27 '17 at 15:58

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