I have heard some people claim that the Tyrolean crossing is named after the Tyrol region in Austria, but I cannot find any reference to it.

Is this practice from Tyrol?

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The thread below is the only mention of the people first responsible for the traverse. This is credited as Tita Piaz and Hans Dülfer (although due to the lack of quantity of information there may have been others involved).

Of note is this translation of the wikipedia article on Tita Piaz:

It is also popular with climbers for inventing the technique of rappelling . Today his technique, which went into disuse with the advent of harnesses and modern belay devices , is known simply as "Piaz method" or "Dulfer-Piaz" (also the mountaineer Hans Dulfer is considered the inventor of this technique).

And this one from the Hans Dülfer wikipedia page:

In addition to success in climbing, layback was very important for the technical innovations introduced. The best known are the techniques of abseiling that still bears his name, Dülfersitz, 3 and the technique for ascending layback cracks in the rock.

Also of note is this mention in Pilgrims of the Vertical:

...and by 1900 Hans Dülfer, Otto Herzog, and Hans Fiechtl had refined and systematized aid climbing. They forged harder pitons for the thinner cracks, steel snap-links (carabiners) to connect pitons to the rope, and rope ladders (etriers) to attach to pitons. but the values inscribed in their climbs and writings had already reshaped the sport.They also created new techniques such as a body belay to hold falls, a way to wrap the rope around a body and rap- pel downward, and a method of penduluming.

Thread: History of the Tyrolean Traverse:

Piaz and Duelfer were contemporaries-- Piaz claims to have done the first, but I doubt that we could definitively credit one or the other at this point. There's no doubt that it was part of the technical innovation to come out of the Dolomites and the Kaisergebrige in the Tirolian Alps. Pitons, rappelling, tension traverses, aid climbing, stirrups, pendulums, and the Tirolian traverse were all developed by Bavarian, Tirolian and South Tirolian climbers in the late 19th and early 20th century.

http://ezra.cornell.edu/posting.php?timestamp=1302159600

“‘Tyro’ is short for Tyrolean Traverse, a climbing system using ropes to horizontally cross a barrier such as a raging river, a crevasse, or, in this case, one of Cornell’s famous gorges. It was first developed by climbers in the eastern Alps of Austria/Italy, in a region called Tirol. Think of it as a practical zip line, where the goal is not to go fast, but to simply to cross an otherwise impassible barrier.”

History of the zipline:

There's no doubt that it was part of the technical innovation to come out of the Dolomites and the Kaisergebrige in the Tirolian Alps. Pitons, rappelling, tension traverses, aid climbing, stirrups, pendulums, and the Tirolian traverse were all developed by Bavarian, Tirolian and South Tirolian climbers in the late 19th and early 20th century.

  • thanks, the article is nice but I am looking some reference or investigation made by some credible source like an university. – santiagozky Jun 5 '11 at 23:47
  • @santiagozky - See my updated answer. I don't think you are going to find a university article. – going Jun 5 '11 at 23:59
  • yes, I've been looking also and haven't find anything more interesting than that. Thanks for taking your time to find the info. – santiagozky Jun 6 '11 at 0:25

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