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This post on Quora says:

500USD/month, construction work 14 hours/day, average temperature 40℃

I found this Daily Mail article with the heading, "The side of Dubai that they DON'T want tourists to see: ..." which says:

The labourers usually work 14 hours where in summer the temperature goes over 50C.

Do construction workers usually work for 14 hours a day in Dubai?

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    What does "some" mean? At least one worker has ever worked 14 hours in a day? At least one worker works 14 hours frequently (what does frequently mean?)? At least a fraction of X% of workers works 14 hours a day frequently? The first claim is almost surely true, the latter depends on the X% fraction... – Bakuriu Jan 1 '17 at 16:05
  • @Bakuriu I fixed that. And thanks for the comment. – Mohammad Sakib Arifin Jan 1 '17 at 16:20
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    FWIW, at one point in my life I worked construction jobs in California's Central Valley - not quite 40℃, but plenty hot - and put in quite a few 14-hour days. Then there was Las Vegas, where I still vividly recall working at 3 AM and seeing the temperature sign on the old Sahara Hotel flashing 113°F (45°C)... So it's not something unique to Dubai. – jamesqf Jan 1 '17 at 19:34
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    Not enough for an answer, but based on my experience living in UAE for 2 years, construction workers receive overtime payment (slightly higher) for every additional hour they work (do not know how long is an ordinary shift lasts). Also keep in mind that majority of the labourers came from countries where they can't earn even 70$ per month and work in way harder condition with way worse equipment, so some of them think that working overtime is a good deal. P.S. 40C is not that bad, try to work in -15C and decide what is better. – Salvador Dali Jan 4 '17 at 5:08
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Working 14 hours in a day is not "usual".

Human rights and health disparities for migrant workers in the UAE Health and Human Rights Journal says:

workers often stay in this heat for up to 14 hours per day. Even though UAE law requires workers to break during the hottest hours, most remain at the job site for 12 hours per day

So 12 hours of being present at the work site is "usual", but this includes significant breaks.

A more recent article, 8-hour shifts, overtime, annual leave in UAE Labour Law explains that time over 8 hours in a day is required to be paid at a high wage, and that 1 hour break is required for 5 hours worked.

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    there is of course a difference between what the law states and what actually happens. Just as there is everywhere. – jwenting Jan 3 '17 at 8:57
  • @jwenting I concur. I have some relatives working in the emergency sector (in Italy) and they often do 12hours shifts, even though by law they should only have 6 hour shifts followed by at least 6 hour of stop (and a lot of other caveats with night shifts etc.). this is due to the fact that there are not enough people to cover appropriately a 24/7 service according to the laws, and there is no money to hire more people (besides it's hard to find hires due to the high responsibility/stress and relatively low pay compared to other medical professions). – Bakuriu Jan 4 '17 at 11:54

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