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In 2002, the National Academies' Institute of Medicine released a report that recommended:

Adults should get 45 percent to 65 percent of their calories from carbohydrates, 20 percent to 35 percent from fat, and 10 to 35 percent from protein.

This is largely a consensus view of the science.

(Dr Caldwell Esselstyn Jr, on the other hand, recommends that no oils should be added to food to avoid heart disease, which might be seen in contradiction to this consensus view.)

Is there sufficient nutritional and epidemiological evidence to support the Institute of Medicine's view about the level of calories that should be obtained from fat for a healthy diet?

  • What are you asking? Why would FDA not give permission? – Mark Sep 5 '16 at 22:13
  • @Mark Esselstyn explains it here – Count Iblis Sep 5 '16 at 22:56
  • The put that in the question - it should stand alone with references to the notable quote. What is the notable quote here? – Mark Sep 5 '16 at 22:57
  • @Mark the quote would be the standard advice as we can e.g. read here "Adults should get 45 percent to 65 percent of their calories from carbohydrates, 20 percent to 35 percent from fat, and 10 to 35 percent from protein. Acceptable ranges for children are similar to those for adults, except that infants and younger children need a slightly higher proportion of fat (25 -40 percent)." – Count Iblis Sep 5 '16 at 23:25
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    @CountIblis: Strawman. No-one is claiming that nutrition and epidemiology are accurate to 10 sigmas. Meanwhile, I still want to simplify this question so it isn't about sophistry and is about examining claims. I'll have a stab at editing it. – Oddthinking Sep 6 '16 at 3:07

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