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Looking at a couple of pedometer instruction leaflets, from different manufacturers, and spotted that they both suggest you can approximate your stride length from your height via the following formula:

females = 0.413 * height

males = 0.415 * height

Are these formula accurate, as they don't account for leg length or weight?

The formula not only appear in numerous instruction booklets but on numerous sites eg.

closed as unclear what you're asking by Oddthinking Aug 19 '15 at 14:41

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • I'm looking for the claim you doubt, that we can investigate. Is it that the quoted formulae are accurate? You answered that yourself. Is it the Daily Mail claim that pedometers disagree with each other by 40%? That's fine, but likely unrelated to the formula. – Oddthinking Aug 19 '15 at 14:44
  • Thanks for clarifying. This isn't a general "ask any question" site. According to the FAQ, Skeptics.SE is for researching the evidence behind the claims you hear or read. The claim here appears to be "the formulae provided in the manuals is accurate". (You should quote more of the manuals so we can see if they are actually claiming this, or merely suggesting an approximation.) You have already refuted this claim in the question; there is no more for an answerer to do (in the scope of Skeptics.SE). – Oddthinking Aug 20 '15 at 1:57
  • Removed my half researched findings, I hope this sufficiently vanilla for you to unleash it on the masses. – arober11 Aug 23 '15 at 23:39
  • Thanks for your sarcasm, but please note that most of your sources explain it is NOT ACCURATE. It appears that nobody is making the claim that these estimates are particularly accurate, so there is no claim to respond to. – Oddthinking Aug 24 '15 at 2:14
  • Meanwhile, the answer to your question is provided in the paper you yourself quoted – Oddthinking Aug 24 '15 at 2:16

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