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My physics teacher used to tell us stories about how food becomes dangerous because of distorted cells in microwaved materials, which in turn may cause cancer. But he wasn't very detailed about it, and I couldn't find any concrete research, just rumors referencing other rumors.

To clarify, the food is not necessarily only junk food, but normal home-made meals (mostly).

Can microwaved food cause harm (cancer or otherwise) if eaten often?

marked as duplicate by Mad Scientist Dec 8 '13 at 20:07

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    "distorted cells"? Any way of heating food causes proteins to change. Boiling an egg or grilling meat do the same thing. It's application of heat to proteins that does the trick, not the specific way in which it happens. Any physics teacher making biological claims on what appears to be a thorough misunderstanding and all encompassing fear of "radiation" should be stripped of their teaching license. – jwenting Dec 9 '13 at 6:25
  • Well, there wouldn't be too many people willing to teach children for minimum wage then. Although, I agree, now that I've learned something about it, non/ionizing radiation is a simple enough concept for teachers to know. – user1306322 Dec 9 '13 at 10:30
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    The problem with eating too much microwaved food is that (most) microwave foods tend to be cheap and optimized for long shelf life and quick preparation, not nutritional value... – Shadur Dec 12 '13 at 13:02
  • @Shadur that's why I mentioned "normal home-made meals mostly". – user1306322 Dec 12 '13 at 15:06

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