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This is known as the Maldekian crop circle

Maldekian crop circle

which (according to this link) contains a message:

Beware the bearers of FALSE gifts & their BROKEN PROMISES.Much PAIN But Still time.(unclear word).There is GOOD out there.We oppose DECEPTION.COnduit CLOSING\

According to the RedGrittyBrick's comment, It seems to be a genuine 2002 cornfield art-work by anonymous fun-loving Hampshire artists. Can any human technology available to common people create this (probably) overnight during reduced visibility? How?

Wikipedia says that these images usually appear overnight (it seems this is the case since there is no evidence about its creation; during the day somebody would probably notice). Some similar crop circles are beautiful and seemingly difficult to create like this, but they mostly consist of simple circles ind lines, maybe even some GPS tracking points. Here the width of the lines requires great deal of precision, so the difference from other crop circles is the complexity: note well shaped spiral on the disc, the end of its track and the exact width of the lines on the face.

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    afaik no crop circle has ever been proven not to have been either a hoax or perfectly natural (twisters, etc.). Your implied claim that this specific one is supernatural, divine, or whatever other than man made or a weather phenomenon is what needs proving, not the reverse. – jwenting Jul 4 '13 at 11:09
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    Please explain what the claim is that is being made in the video so not everyone has to watch the whole thing. It isn't clear what the text you are citing refers to without watching the video. – Oddthinking Jul 4 '13 at 13:06
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    It probably isn’t investigated because there’s no reason to suspect that it’s anything but a hoax. Investigating it would be a waste of time – see Russell’s teapot. The notable claim here is “this is not a hoax”, not the other way round. – Konrad Rudolph Jul 4 '13 at 14:50
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    What do you mean "hoax", It seems to be a genuine 2002 cornfield art-work by anonymous fun-loving Hampshire artists. Has anyone provided any solid evidence for an alternative explanation? – RedGrittyBrick Jul 4 '13 at 16:08
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    I've updated the question again, hope it is better now. I'f not, please point out, thanks for guiding me how to build a correct question - this alone is quite useful. – Jan Turoň Jul 4 '13 at 21:14
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Can any human technology available to common people create this (probably) over night during reduced visibility? How?

Maldekian

A better name for this artwork is the "Crabwood Formation" as it is a corn-drawing revealed on August 15, 2002 at Crabwood near Winchester in Hampshire, England.

Human technology

To flatten crops in circles, you just need stone-age technology such as ropes and planks. Ref

To make complex designs you can make use of a few additional items such as laser pointers, night vision goggles etc. Ref

Common People

Common people can do this but you should note that commercial enterprises do this too, they can afford better tools. Ref They have made examples of complex spiral forms.

Over night

To some extent, adding more people makes the job faster. Careful planning and practice must also be helpful.

The reason some designs are not adjacent to roads (and therefore have to be signalled to the press by an anonymous phone call) are so that they can be constructed over several days (and/or nights)

Some of the alleged witnesses of the Crabwood formation state that it was created over several nights Ref

  • Excellent investigative answer. Did you find the links by simple googling? – Jan Turoň Jul 5 '13 at 20:37
  • @Jan: Yes. When a subject catches my interest and I have time, I enjoy using Google to find information and misinformation - and trying to sift one from the other. I have a lot of books, but not on this sort of subject. – RedGrittyBrick Jul 5 '13 at 22:16
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    +1 For the reference to commercial crop circle makers. There's no reason that these necessarily appear in secret, overnight, without the owner of the property knowing. It's entirely possible that the owner of a farm might pay somebody to come make artwork in their field, for a bit of publicity. – KChaloux May 8 '14 at 13:11

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