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DN.se made an article(2013-06-13) about immigrants contributing economically more than the cost. Immigration is a very hot topic in Sweden, and Sweden have a very high number of refugees.

In 2009, Sweden had the fourth largest number of asylum applications in the EU and the largest number per capita after Cyprus and Malta.

The question is, does this study take into calculation all costs related to immigration, or is it just parts of it? Is there any difference between work-immigrants and refugees in the contributions?

It seems like the stats is too good to be true, and it's commonly said that immigration is breaking down the welfare of Sweden, and that Sweden is going downhill. It's popular stance enough for a racist discontent-party to get voted into the government. I would be interested in an objective and statistics based critical examination of that.

The data the article in DN is based off is from OECD, and the short version is in a picture below, while the full report is linked to bottom of the question.

International Immigration - OECD

enter image description here

Full report (Page 147 is where the picture above is based on, 173 and 174 compares immigrants to non-immigrants)

  • I am assuming this only counts legal immigrants, while oftentimes the problems arise from illegal immigration. – nico Jun 13 '13 at 16:17
  • OK, sorry I am not too much familiar with the situation in Sweden. I am much more familiar with that of Italy where there is a lot of illegal immigration. Anyway, good to clarify! – nico Jun 13 '13 at 16:30
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    You're actually right, that illegal immigrants doesn't show up, and that is a problem. I am not sure how they impact the economy though, since if they are illegal they shouldn't be getting much money from the state. – Wertilq Jun 13 '13 at 17:32
  • Do expats count as immigrants? – vartec Jun 13 '13 at 20:52
  • yes they count I think. – Wertilq Jun 14 '13 at 7:05

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