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According to Wikipedia, a Mickey Slim is a cocktail made by combining gin with "a pinch of DDT" which provided an experience similar to (the original) absinthe. The source appears to be The Dedalus Book of Absinthe. Did such a cocktail really exist?

I've also seen references (can't find them now) which show people inhaling DDT to get a cheap high like in this picture:

enter image description here

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    That picture by the way is not about people getting a cheap high of DDT. Google DDT Spraying people and you will find loads of images like this. They just didn't know about health issues, but these cars were just driving around beaches spraying DDT like crazy against insects. – Hendrik Beenker Feb 8 '13 at 12:45
  • @Hendrik Right, when my parents were kids they used to follow around the DDT spraying trucks to play in the fog of DDT. – Sam I Am Feb 9 '13 at 2:31
  • @Hendrik Found a reference (and I'm using the term loosely here) which also mentions 'Mickey Slim'. – user7920 Feb 9 '13 at 16:08
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TLDR : Apparently there is no concrete proof of the drink existence.

Most of the references go around to The Dedalus Book of Absinthe or a citation in BBC1 documentary called ‘The Rise and Fall of DDT’ from 1974.

Someone did most the work for me, apparently : the myth of the mickey slim

and this what I think may be the origin of the mith:

George Campbell, who helped initiate DDT production in Britain, said: ‘In American bars, there was a drink, called Mickey Slim. If [sic] was a good gin with a spot of DDT in it, and this was supposed to give you a feeling of happiness and merriment. You can see this in the behaviour of flies if they are subjected to DDT. Their first effort is to fly about, as though they were full of the joys of the spring, and then they gradually die off.’” - “Out of the Air.” Listener [London, England] 12 Sept. 1974: 332.

as a sidenote, I would like to point you to this.

is absinthe hallucinogenic

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