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I recently came across a journal entry, written in December 2012, about racial violence in Australia.

The entry mentioned an incident against a woman targeted for singing in French. I assume this refers to an alleged incident against Fanny Desaintjores involving racist abuse and attempted violence: I realised he wasn't kidding ... I stopped laughing.

The entry also mentioned an alleged spate of racial violence against Koreans. The entry didn't have any links, but I assume Aussies accused of 'racist violence' in Korean press is the kind of thing the blogger was referring to.

But the entry also mentioned an alleged spate of violence against Indians a couple of years ago. I assume the author is referring to this. The author mentioned that the Australian government denied that the violence was racially motivated, but she didn't believe the government.

I thought the idea of a spate of racially motivated violence against Indians was debunked.

I heard that most of the high profile assault cases that made international headlines turned out to either be violence done by Indians against other Indians, or some Indians trying to commit insurance fraud via arson, and injuring themselves and trying to attribute the arson to racially motivated violence.

I've also heard Indian students were highly represented in being victims of robberies, but that they involved Indian students merely because they were working in late night shifts (due to their studies), and therefore more vulnerable to robbery, and that race didn't play a role in the robberies.

In Australia, during the late 2000s, and the early 2010s, was there a major spate of violence, committed by people who were not of Indian or related nationality, where the victims were Indian? If so, was the victims' ethnicity or nationality a factor?

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    My wife is Indian and she's pretty adamant that she does not ever want to live or work in Australia because of this. I really hope this question gets a good answer. – Ian Jan 28 '13 at 10:22
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    Essentially, the wikipedia article is as good as you're going to get. There were a very small amount of attacks, which possibly could have had multiple influencing factors. Factors such as age, location and possessions (ie students = laptops) were likely far more influencing than race. – Trasvi Jan 31 '13 at 8:55

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