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Did the Donner party resort to cannibalism while snowbound during winter,in 1846-7?

So which is it? Did they eat the forbidden flesh or not?

Here is a large amount of background and accounts of cannibalism that I have picked through from the fairly long wikipedia article on the Donner Party.

Did the Donner party resort to cannibalism while snowbound during winter, 1846?

Here is a large amount of background and accounts of cannibalism that I have picked through from the fairly long wikipedia article on the Donner Party.

Did the Donner party resort to cannibalism while snowbound in 1846-7?

So which is it? Did they eat the forbidden flesh or not?

Here is a large amount of background and accounts of cannibalism that I have picked through from the fairly long wikipedia article on the Donner Party.

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Although some survivors disputed the accounts of cannibalism, Charles >McGlashan, who corresponded with many of the survivors over a 40-year period, >documented many recollections that it occurred. [he later wrote "History of the Donner Party""History of the Donner Party" in 1879]

Eliza Donner Houghton, in her 1911 account of the ordealEliza Donner Houghton, in her 1911 account of the ordeal, did not mention any cannibalism at Alder Creek. Archaeological findings at the Alder Creek camp proved inconclusive for evidence of cannibalism

Eliza Farnham's 1856 account of the Donner Party was based largely on an interview with Margaret Breen. Her version details the ordeals of the Graves and Breen families after James Reed and the second relief left them in the snow pit. According to Farnham, seven-year-old Mary Donner suggested to the others that they should eat Isaac Donner, Franklin Graves, Jr., and Elizabeth Graves, because the Donners had already begun eating the others at Alder Creek, including Mary's father Jacob. Margaret Breen insisted that she and her family did not cannibalize the dead, but Kristin Johnson, Ethan Rarick, and Joseph King – whose account is sympathetic to the Breen family – do not consider it credible that the Breens, who had been without food for nine days, would have been able to survive without eating human flesh.

Although some survivors disputed the accounts of cannibalism, Charles >McGlashan, who corresponded with many of the survivors over a 40-year period, >documented many recollections that it occurred. [he later wrote "History of the Donner Party" in 1879]

Eliza Donner Houghton, in her 1911 account of the ordeal, did not mention any cannibalism at Alder Creek. Archaeological findings at the Alder Creek camp proved inconclusive for evidence of cannibalism

Eliza Farnham's 1856 account of the Donner Party was based largely on an interview with Margaret Breen. Her version details the ordeals of the Graves and Breen families after James Reed and the second relief left them in the snow pit. According to Farnham, seven-year-old Mary Donner suggested to the others that they should eat Isaac Donner, Franklin Graves, Jr., and Elizabeth Graves, because the Donners had already begun eating the others at Alder Creek, including Mary's father Jacob. Margaret Breen insisted that she and her family did not cannibalize the dead, but Kristin Johnson, Ethan Rarick, and Joseph King – whose account is sympathetic to the Breen family – do not consider it credible that the Breens, who had been without food for nine days, would have been able to survive without eating human flesh.

Although some survivors disputed the accounts of cannibalism, Charles >McGlashan, who corresponded with many of the survivors over a 40-year period, >documented many recollections that it occurred. [he later wrote "History of the Donner Party" in 1879]

Eliza Donner Houghton, in her 1911 account of the ordeal, did not mention any cannibalism at Alder Creek. Archaeological findings at the Alder Creek camp proved inconclusive for evidence of cannibalism

Eliza Farnham's 1856 account of the Donner Party was based largely on an interview with Margaret Breen. Her version details the ordeals of the Graves and Breen families after James Reed and the second relief left them in the snow pit. According to Farnham, seven-year-old Mary Donner suggested to the others that they should eat Isaac Donner, Franklin Graves, Jr., and Elizabeth Graves, because the Donners had already begun eating the others at Alder Creek, including Mary's father Jacob. Margaret Breen insisted that she and her family did not cannibalize the dead, but Kristin Johnson, Ethan Rarick, and Joseph King – whose account is sympathetic to the Breen family – do not consider it credible that the Breens, who had been without food for nine days, would have been able to survive without eating human flesh.

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Did the Donner party resort to cannibalism while snowbound during winter, 1846?

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