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Audible car alarms do not have noa significant effect on car theft.

The insurance data are unequivocal. In 1997, the non-profit Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) surveyed insurance-claims data from 73 million vehicles, to see which devices could prevent theft. Looking at cars from many different model years, across the country, the study concludes that cars with alarms "show no overall reduction in theft losses" compared to cars without alarms.

Paper: "Alarmingly Useless, The Case for Banning Car Alarms, in New York City", by Aaron Friedman, Aaron Naparstek & Mateo Taussig-Rubbo

There are a variety of antitheft and tracking systems on the market with costs ranging from basic audible alarms costing $50 to sophisticated tracking systems with $30 monthly fees. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of many of these devices is questionable. The sensitivity of audible alarms to touch or movement, for example, provokes a “boy who cried wolf” reaction. When a car alarm goes off, people tend not to react because the alarms activate so frequently for reasons other than actual theft. HLDI studies show no overall reduction in theft losses for vehicles with such alarms.

Article: Highway Loss Data Institute, "Insurance industry analyses and the prevention of motor vehicle theft," Business and Crime Prevention (Marcus Felson and Ronald V. Clarke, eds.), pp. 283-93, Monsey, NY: Willow Tree Press, Inc.: 1997

Audible car alarms have no effect on car theft.

The insurance data are unequivocal. In 1997, the non-profit Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) surveyed insurance-claims data from 73 million vehicles, to see which devices could prevent theft. Looking at cars from many different model years, across the country, the study concludes that cars with alarms "show no overall reduction in theft losses" compared to cars without alarms.

Paper: "Alarmingly Useless, The Case for Banning Car Alarms, in New York City", by Aaron Friedman, Aaron Naparstek & Mateo Taussig-Rubbo

There are a variety of antitheft and tracking systems on the market with costs ranging from basic audible alarms costing $50 to sophisticated tracking systems with $30 monthly fees. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of many of these devices is questionable. The sensitivity of audible alarms to touch or movement, for example, provokes a “boy who cried wolf” reaction. When a car alarm goes off, people tend not to react because the alarms activate so frequently for reasons other than actual theft. HLDI studies show no overall reduction in theft losses for vehicles with such alarms.

Article: Highway Loss Data Institute, "Insurance industry analyses and the prevention of motor vehicle theft," Business and Crime Prevention (Marcus Felson and Ronald V. Clarke, eds.), pp. 283-93, Monsey, NY: Willow Tree Press, Inc.: 1997

Audible car alarms do not have a significant effect on car theft.

The insurance data are unequivocal. In 1997, the non-profit Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) surveyed insurance-claims data from 73 million vehicles, to see which devices could prevent theft. Looking at cars from many different model years, across the country, the study concludes that cars with alarms "show no overall reduction in theft losses" compared to cars without alarms.

Paper: "Alarmingly Useless, The Case for Banning Car Alarms, in New York City", by Aaron Friedman, Aaron Naparstek & Mateo Taussig-Rubbo

There are a variety of antitheft and tracking systems on the market with costs ranging from basic audible alarms costing $50 to sophisticated tracking systems with $30 monthly fees. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of many of these devices is questionable. The sensitivity of audible alarms to touch or movement, for example, provokes a “boy who cried wolf” reaction. When a car alarm goes off, people tend not to react because the alarms activate so frequently for reasons other than actual theft. HLDI studies show no overall reduction in theft losses for vehicles with such alarms.

Article: Highway Loss Data Institute, "Insurance industry analyses and the prevention of motor vehicle theft," Business and Crime Prevention (Marcus Felson and Ronald V. Clarke, eds.), pp. 283-93, Monsey, NY: Willow Tree Press, Inc.: 1997

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Audible car alarms have no effect on car theft.

The insurance data are unequivocal. In 1997, the non-profit Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) surveyed insurance-claims data from 73 million vehicles, to see which devices could prevent theft. Looking at cars from many different model years, across the country, the study concludes that cars with alarms "show no overall reduction in theft losses" compared to cars without alarms.

Paper: "Alarmingly Useless, The Case for Banning Car Alarms, in New York City", by Aaron Friedman, Aaron Naparstek & Mateo Taussig-Rubbo

There are a variety of antitheft and tracking systems on the market with costs ranging from basic audible alarms costing $50 to sophisticated tracking systems with $30 monthly fees. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of many of these devices is questionable. The sensitivity of audible alarms to touch or movement, for example, provokes a “boy who cried wolf” reaction. When a car alarm goes off, people tend not to react because the alarms activate so frequently for reasons other than actual theft. HLDI studies show no overall reduction in theft losses for vehicles with such alarms.

Article: Highway Loss Data Institute, "Insurance industry analyses and the prevention of motor vehicle theft," Business and Crime Prevention (Marcus Felson and Ronald V. Clarke, eds.), pp. 283-93, Monsey, NY: Willow Tree Press, Inc.: 1997

Audible car alarms have no effect on car theft.

There are a variety of antitheft and tracking systems on the market with costs ranging from basic audible alarms costing $50 to sophisticated tracking systems with $30 monthly fees. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of many of these devices is questionable. The sensitivity of audible alarms to touch or movement, for example, provokes a “boy who cried wolf” reaction. When a car alarm goes off, people tend not to react because the alarms activate so frequently for reasons other than actual theft. HLDI studies show no overall reduction in theft losses for vehicles with such alarms.

Article: Highway Loss Data Institute, "Insurance industry analyses and the prevention of motor vehicle theft," Business and Crime Prevention (Marcus Felson and Ronald V. Clarke, eds.), pp. 283-93, Monsey, NY: Willow Tree Press, Inc.: 1997

Audible car alarms have no effect on car theft.

The insurance data are unequivocal. In 1997, the non-profit Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) surveyed insurance-claims data from 73 million vehicles, to see which devices could prevent theft. Looking at cars from many different model years, across the country, the study concludes that cars with alarms "show no overall reduction in theft losses" compared to cars without alarms.

Paper: "Alarmingly Useless, The Case for Banning Car Alarms, in New York City", by Aaron Friedman, Aaron Naparstek & Mateo Taussig-Rubbo

There are a variety of antitheft and tracking systems on the market with costs ranging from basic audible alarms costing $50 to sophisticated tracking systems with $30 monthly fees. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of many of these devices is questionable. The sensitivity of audible alarms to touch or movement, for example, provokes a “boy who cried wolf” reaction. When a car alarm goes off, people tend not to react because the alarms activate so frequently for reasons other than actual theft. HLDI studies show no overall reduction in theft losses for vehicles with such alarms.

Article: Highway Loss Data Institute, "Insurance industry analyses and the prevention of motor vehicle theft," Business and Crime Prevention (Marcus Felson and Ronald V. Clarke, eds.), pp. 283-93, Monsey, NY: Willow Tree Press, Inc.: 1997

3 Here is the quotation from the article you citied, along with a copy of it if you wanna get more information from it!
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Audible car alarms have no effect on car theft.

"The insurance data are unequivocal. In 1997, the non-profit Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) surveyed insurance-claims data from 73 million vehicles, to see which devices could prevent theft. Looking at cars from many different model years, across the country, the study concludes that cars with alarms "show no overall reduction in theft losses" compared to cars without alarms." [1]

There are a variety of antitheft and tracking systems on the market with costs ranging from basic audible alarms costing $50 to sophisticated tracking systems with $30 monthly fees. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of many of these devices is questionable. The sensitivity of audible alarms to touch or movement, for example, provokes a “boy who cried wolf” reaction. When a car alarm goes off, people tend not to react because the alarms activate so frequently for reasons other than actual theft. HLDI studies show no overall reduction in theft losses for vehicles with such alarms.

[1]Article: Highway Loss Data Institute, "Insurance industry analyses and the prevention of motor vehicle theft," Business and Crime Prevention (Marcus Felson and Ronald V. Clarke, eds.), pp. 283-93, Monsey, NY: Willow Tree Press, Inc.: 1997

Audible car alarms have no effect on car theft.

"The insurance data are unequivocal. In 1997, the non-profit Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) surveyed insurance-claims data from 73 million vehicles, to see which devices could prevent theft. Looking at cars from many different model years, across the country, the study concludes that cars with alarms "show no overall reduction in theft losses" compared to cars without alarms." [1]

[1] Highway Loss Data Institute, "Insurance industry analyses and the prevention of motor vehicle theft," Business and Crime Prevention (Marcus Felson and Ronald V. Clarke, eds.), pp. 283-93, Monsey, NY: Willow Tree Press, Inc.: 1997

Audible car alarms have no effect on car theft.

There are a variety of antitheft and tracking systems on the market with costs ranging from basic audible alarms costing $50 to sophisticated tracking systems with $30 monthly fees. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of many of these devices is questionable. The sensitivity of audible alarms to touch or movement, for example, provokes a “boy who cried wolf” reaction. When a car alarm goes off, people tend not to react because the alarms activate so frequently for reasons other than actual theft. HLDI studies show no overall reduction in theft losses for vehicles with such alarms.

Article: Highway Loss Data Institute, "Insurance industry analyses and the prevention of motor vehicle theft," Business and Crime Prevention (Marcus Felson and Ronald V. Clarke, eds.), pp. 283-93, Monsey, NY: Willow Tree Press, Inc.: 1997

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