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I am not an authority on this matter but have explored the validity, or lack thereof, of homeopathy for about 10 years; the answers already provided are excellent, and here is my answer (from the USA):

Paraphrasing question #1: Can this product be harmful? In short, potentially yes. In the US, and similarly in other countries, homeopathy is exempthomeopathy is exempt from the FDA's standard safety (and efficacy) requirements for medications, even as many of the active ingredients used in homeopathic remedies are purposely derived from dangerous if not deadly substances. In the remedy under discussion, for example, Nux Vomica contains high levels of strychnine (AKA "poison nut"), a dangerous neurotoxin. True, the active ingredients in this and most homeopathic products are so diluted that they are very unlikely to (and often cannot plausibly) cause either harm (or benefits), but that is only if the listed dilutions are accurate and if the product is not contaminated or adulterated. To illustrate my point, note that Hyland's teething tablets were recalled after a number of consumers' reported babies suffering symptoms consistent with Belladonna poisoning; the FDA issued a consumer alert and recall after finding inconsistent amounts of the poison in samples of the product and no child proof safety caps.

Not pertaining to the product under question, but the public should be aware that some OTC products labeled as "homeopathic" use relatively high concentrations of active ingredients, thus they can conceivably have a physiological effect -- including side-effects. E.g. Zicam's cold remedies used just a 1x dilution of zinc (one part zinc to 10 parts water) in their cold remedies, resulting in hundreds of reports of permanent loss of smell. Products are exempt from many FDA safety regulations if they are claimed as "homeopathic."

Paraphrasing question #2: Assuming there are sufficient quantities to have a clinical effect after dilution, can any of these particular ingredients help with sinus problems? In short, very highly doubtful, given the dubious premises of homeopathygiven the dubious premises of homeopathy. Aside from believing that the heavy dilutions make remedies MORE potent as they are "succussed" (shaken) more times, homeopathy makes another irrational assumption that "like cures like" (or law of similars). First, they use a highly subjective and unscientific process ironically called "provings" (more like testimonials) to fill a pharmacopeia of physical and mental symptoms that are assumed to be universal reactions to particular substances. Then, they use these substances, many of which are toxic-- after diluting them to render them harmless (let's hope!) -- as "active ingredients" to treat the listed symptoms. Underlying Underlying causes for the person's symptoms are regarded as irrelevant.  

Homeopathic "law" of similars"law of similars" can't be farther from what scientists regard as "laws" of nature, as it is implausible to believe that all substances that cause certain symptoms will reduce those symptoms if heavily diluted (andand shaken between dilutions). Ironically, many homeopaths reject vaccines, an actual example of a "law of similars"substance that causes illness being used to treat it (actually to prevent it), while favoring instead, for example, ground duck liver and heart (giving- giving it a sciency name, Oscillococcinum)Oscillococcinum - diluted to non-existence to purportedly treat influenza symptoms.

Based on homeopathic premises, I will guess that the manufacturer of the product in question added diluted onion because eating onions caused a prover's eyes to tear and nose to run, and perhaps histamines were added because histamines in the body can lead to upper respiratory allergy symptoms. Even if not diluted, I couldn't find any scientific evidence online that any of the listed ingredients can effectively treat sinus problems.

I am not an authority on this matter but have explored the validity, or lack thereof, of homeopathy for about 10 years; the answers already provided are excellent, and here is my answer (from the USA):

Paraphrasing question #1: Can this product be harmful? In short, potentially yes. In the US, and similarly in other countries, homeopathy is exempt from the FDA's standard safety (and efficacy) requirements for medications, even as many of the active ingredients used in homeopathic remedies are purposely derived from dangerous if not deadly substances. In the remedy under discussion, for example, Nux Vomica contains high levels of strychnine (AKA "poison nut"), a dangerous neurotoxin. True, the active ingredients in this and most homeopathic products are so diluted that they are very unlikely to (and often cannot plausibly) cause either harm (or benefits), but that is only if the listed dilutions are accurate and if the product is not contaminated or adulterated. To illustrate my point, note that Hyland's teething tablets were recalled after a number of consumers' reported babies suffering symptoms consistent with Belladonna poisoning; the FDA issued a consumer alert and recall after finding inconsistent amounts of the poison in samples of the product and no child proof safety caps.

Not pertaining to the product under question, but the public should be aware that some OTC products labeled as "homeopathic" use relatively high concentrations of active ingredients, thus they can conceivably have a physiological effect -- including side-effects. E.g. Zicam's cold remedies used just a 1x dilution of zinc (one part zinc to 10 parts water) in their cold remedies, resulting in hundreds of reports of permanent loss of smell. Products are exempt from many FDA safety regulations if they are claimed as "homeopathic."

Paraphrasing question #2: Assuming there are sufficient quantities to have a clinical effect after dilution, can any of these particular ingredients help with sinus problems? In short, very highly doubtful, given the dubious premises of homeopathy. Aside from believing that the heavy dilutions make remedies MORE potent, homeopathy makes another irrational assumption that "like cures like" (or law of similars). First, they use a highly subjective and unscientific process ironically called "provings" (more like testimonials) to fill a pharmacopeia of physical and mental symptoms that are assumed to be universal reactions to particular substances. Then, they use these substances, many of which are toxic-- after diluting them to render them harmless (let's hope!) -- as "active ingredients" to treat the listed symptoms. Underlying causes for the person's symptoms are regarded as irrelevant.  

Homeopathic "law" of similars can't be farther from what scientists regard as "laws" of nature, as it is implausible to believe that all substances that cause certain symptoms will reduce those symptoms if heavily diluted (and shaken between dilutions). Ironically, many homeopaths reject vaccines, an actual example of a "law of similars", while favoring instead, for example, ground duck liver and heart (giving it a sciency name, Oscillococcinum) diluted to non-existence to purportedly treat influenza symptoms.

Based on homeopathic premises, I will guess that the manufacturer of the product in question added diluted onion because eating onions caused a prover's eyes to tear and nose to run, and perhaps histamines were added because histamines in the body can lead to upper respiratory allergy symptoms. Even if not diluted, I couldn't find any scientific evidence online that any of the listed ingredients can effectively treat sinus problems.

I am not an authority on this matter but have explored the validity, or lack thereof, of homeopathy for about 10 years; the answers already provided are excellent, and here is my answer (from the USA):

Paraphrasing question #1: Can this product be harmful? In short, potentially yes. In the US, and similarly in other countries, homeopathy is exempt from the FDA's standard safety (and efficacy) requirements for medications, even as many of the active ingredients used in homeopathic remedies are purposely derived from dangerous if not deadly substances. In the remedy under discussion, for example, Nux Vomica contains high levels of strychnine (AKA "poison nut"), a dangerous neurotoxin. True, the active ingredients in this and most homeopathic products are so diluted that they are very unlikely to (and often cannot plausibly) cause either harm (or benefits), but that is only if the listed dilutions are accurate and if the product is not contaminated or adulterated. To illustrate my point, note that Hyland's teething tablets were recalled after a number of consumers' reported babies suffering symptoms consistent with Belladonna poisoning; the FDA issued a consumer alert and recall after finding inconsistent amounts of the poison in samples of the product and no child proof safety caps.

Not pertaining to the product under question, but the public should be aware that some OTC products labeled as "homeopathic" use relatively high concentrations of active ingredients, thus they can conceivably have a physiological effect -- including side-effects. E.g. Zicam's cold remedies used just a 1x dilution of zinc (one part zinc to 10 parts water) in their cold remedies, resulting in hundreds of reports of permanent loss of smell. Products are exempt from many FDA safety regulations if they are claimed as "homeopathic."

Paraphrasing question #2: Assuming there are sufficient quantities to have a clinical effect after dilution, can any of these particular ingredients help with sinus problems? In short, very highly doubtful, given the dubious premises of homeopathy. Aside from believing that the heavy dilutions make remedies MORE potent as they are "succussed" (shaken) more times, homeopathy makes another irrational assumption that "like cures like" (or law of similars). First, they use a highly subjective and unscientific process ironically called "provings" (more like testimonials) to fill a pharmacopeia of physical and mental symptoms that are assumed to be universal reactions to particular substances. Then, they use these substances, many of which are toxic-- after diluting them to render them harmless (let's hope!) -- as "active ingredients" to treat the listed symptoms. Underlying causes for the person's symptoms are regarded as irrelevant.

Homeopathic "law of similars" can't be farther from what scientists regard as "laws" of nature, as it is implausible to believe that all substances that cause certain symptoms will reduce those symptoms if heavily diluted and shaken between dilutions. Ironically, many homeopaths reject vaccines, an actual example of a substance that causes illness being used to treat it (actually to prevent it), while favoring instead, for example, ground duck liver and heart - giving it a sciency name, Oscillococcinum - diluted to non-existence to purportedly treat influenza symptoms.

Based on homeopathic premises, I will guess that the manufacturer of the product in question added diluted onion because eating onions caused a prover's eyes to tear and nose to run, and perhaps histamines were added because histamines in the body can lead to upper respiratory allergy symptoms. Even if not diluted, I couldn't find any scientific evidence online that any of the listed ingredients can effectively treat sinus problems.

2 Made some minor edits and added one link within text to 2nd questions's answer (more to come).
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I am not an authority on this matter but have explored the validity, or lack thereof, of homeopathy for about 10 years; the answers already provided are excellent, and here is my answer (from the USA):

Paraphrasing question #1: Can this product be harmful?Paraphrasing question #1: Can this product be harmful? In short, potentially yes. In the US, and similarly in other countries, homeopathy is exempt from the FDA's standard safety (and efficacy) requirements for medications, even as many of the active ingredients used in homeopathic remedies are purposely derived from dangerous if not deadly substances. In the remedy under discussion, for example, Nux Vomica contains high levels of strychnine (AKA "poison nut"), a dangerous neurotoxin. True, the active ingredients in this and most homeopathic products are so diluted that they are very unlikely to (and often cannot plausibly) cause either harm (or benefits), but that is only if the listed dilutions are accurate and if the product is not contaminated or adulterated. To illustrate my point, note that Hyland's teething tablets were recalled after a number of consumers' reported babies suffering symptoms consistent with Belladonna poisoning; the FDA issued a consumer alert and recall after finding inconsistent amounts of the poison in samples of the product and no child proof safety caps.

Not pertaining to the product under question, but the public should be aware that some OTC products labeled as "homeopathic" use relatively high concentrations of active ingredients, thus they can conceivably have a physiological effect -- including side-effects. E.g. Zicam's cold remedies used just a 1x dilution of zinc (one part zinc to 10 parts substratewater) in their cold remedies resulted, resulting in hundreds of reports of permanent loss of smell. Products are exempt from many FDA safety regulations if they are claimed as "homeopathic."

Paraphrasing question #2: Assuming there are sufficient quantities to have a clinical effect after dilution, can any of these particular ingredients help with sinus problems?Paraphrasing question #2: Assuming there are sufficient quantities to have a clinical effect after dilution, can any of these particular ingredients help with sinus problems? In short, very highly doubtful, given the dubious premises of homeopathy. Aside from believing that the heavy dilutions make remedies MORE potent, homeopathy makes another irrational assumption that "like cures like" (or law of similars). First, they use a highly subjective and unscientific process ironically called "provings" (more like testimonials) to fill a pharmacopeia of physical and mental symptoms that are assumed to be universal reactions to particular substances. Then, they use these substances, many of which are toxic-- after diluting them to render them harmless (let's hope!) -- as "active ingredients" to treat the listed symptoms. Underlying causes for the person's symptoms are regarded as irrelevant. Their

Homeopathic "law" of similars can't be farther from what scientists regard as "laws" of nature, as it is implausible to believe that all substances that cause certain symptoms will reduce those symptoms if heavily diluted (and shaken between dilutions). Ironically, many homeopaths reject vaccinesmany homeopaths reject vaccines, an actual example of "like cures like"a "law of similars", while favoring instead, for example, ground duck liver and heart (giving it a sciency name, Oscillococcinum) diluted to non-existence to purportedly treat influenza symptoms. I

Based on homeopathic premises, I will guess that the manufacturer of the product in question added diluted onion because eating onions caused a prover's eyes to tear and nose to run, and perhaps histamines were added because histamines in the body can lead to upper respiratory allergy symptoms. I Even if not diluted, I couldn't find any scientific evidence online that any of the listed ingredients can effectively treat sinus problems.

I am not an authority on this matter but have explored the validity, or lack thereof, of homeopathy for about 10 years; the answers already provided are excellent, and here is my answer (from the USA):

Paraphrasing question #1: Can this product be harmful? In short, potentially yes. In the US, and similarly in other countries, homeopathy is exempt from the FDA's standard safety (and efficacy) requirements for medications, even as many of the active ingredients used in homeopathic remedies are purposely derived from dangerous if not deadly substances. In the remedy under discussion, for example, Nux Vomica contains high levels of strychnine (AKA "poison nut"), a dangerous neurotoxin. True, the active ingredients in this and most homeopathic products are so diluted that they are very unlikely to (and often cannot plausibly) cause either harm (or benefits), but that is only if the listed dilutions are accurate and if the product is not contaminated or adulterated. To illustrate my point, note that Hyland's teething tablets were recalled after a number of consumers' reported babies suffering symptoms consistent with Belladonna poisoning; the FDA issued a consumer alert and recall after finding inconsistent amounts of the poison in samples of the product and no child proof safety caps.

Not pertaining to the product under question, but the public should be aware that some OTC products labeled as "homeopathic" use relatively high concentrations of active ingredients, thus they can conceivably have a physiological effect -- including side-effects. E.g. Zicam's cold remedies used just a 1x dilution of zinc (one part zinc to 10 parts substrate) in their cold remedies resulted in hundreds of reports of permanent loss of smell. Products are exempt from many FDA safety regulations if they are claimed as "homeopathic."

Paraphrasing question #2: Assuming there are sufficient quantities to have a clinical effect after dilution, can any of these particular ingredients help with sinus problems? In short, very highly doubtful, given the dubious premises of homeopathy. Aside from believing that the heavy dilutions make remedies MORE potent, homeopathy makes another irrational assumption that "like cures like" (or law of similars). First, they use a highly subjective and unscientific process ironically called "provings" (more like testimonials) to fill a pharmacopeia of physical and mental symptoms that are assumed to be universal reactions to particular substances. Then, they use these substances, many of which are toxic-- after diluting them to render them harmless (let's hope!) -- as "active ingredients" to treat the listed symptoms. Underlying causes for the person's symptoms as irrelevant. Their "law" of similars can't be farther from what scientists regard as "laws" of nature. Ironically, many homeopaths reject vaccines, an actual example of "like cures like", while favoring instead, for example, ground duck liver and heart (giving it a sciency name, Oscillococcinum) diluted to non-existence to purportedly treat influenza. I will guess that the manufacturer of the product in question added diluted onion because eating onions caused a prover's eyes to tear and nose to run, and perhaps histamines were added because histamines in the body can lead to upper respiratory allergy symptoms. I couldn't find any scientific evidence online that any of the listed ingredients can effectively treat sinus problems.

I am not an authority on this matter but have explored the validity, or lack thereof, of homeopathy for about 10 years; the answers already provided are excellent, and here is my answer (from the USA):

Paraphrasing question #1: Can this product be harmful? In short, potentially yes. In the US, and similarly in other countries, homeopathy is exempt from the FDA's standard safety (and efficacy) requirements for medications, even as many of the active ingredients used in homeopathic remedies are purposely derived from dangerous if not deadly substances. In the remedy under discussion, for example, Nux Vomica contains high levels of strychnine (AKA "poison nut"), a dangerous neurotoxin. True, the active ingredients in this and most homeopathic products are so diluted that they are very unlikely to (and often cannot plausibly) cause either harm (or benefits), but that is only if the listed dilutions are accurate and if the product is not contaminated or adulterated. To illustrate my point, note that Hyland's teething tablets were recalled after a number of consumers' reported babies suffering symptoms consistent with Belladonna poisoning; the FDA issued a consumer alert and recall after finding inconsistent amounts of the poison in samples of the product and no child proof safety caps.

Not pertaining to the product under question, but the public should be aware that some OTC products labeled as "homeopathic" use relatively high concentrations of active ingredients, thus they can conceivably have a physiological effect -- including side-effects. E.g. Zicam's cold remedies used just a 1x dilution of zinc (one part zinc to 10 parts water) in their cold remedies, resulting in hundreds of reports of permanent loss of smell. Products are exempt from many FDA safety regulations if they are claimed as "homeopathic."

Paraphrasing question #2: Assuming there are sufficient quantities to have a clinical effect after dilution, can any of these particular ingredients help with sinus problems? In short, very highly doubtful, given the dubious premises of homeopathy. Aside from believing that the heavy dilutions make remedies MORE potent, homeopathy makes another irrational assumption that "like cures like" (or law of similars). First, they use a highly subjective and unscientific process ironically called "provings" (more like testimonials) to fill a pharmacopeia of physical and mental symptoms that are assumed to be universal reactions to particular substances. Then, they use these substances, many of which are toxic-- after diluting them to render them harmless (let's hope!) -- as "active ingredients" to treat the listed symptoms. Underlying causes for the person's symptoms are regarded as irrelevant.

Homeopathic "law" of similars can't be farther from what scientists regard as "laws" of nature, as it is implausible to believe that all substances that cause certain symptoms will reduce those symptoms if heavily diluted (and shaken between dilutions). Ironically, many homeopaths reject vaccines, an actual example of a "law of similars", while favoring instead, for example, ground duck liver and heart (giving it a sciency name, Oscillococcinum) diluted to non-existence to purportedly treat influenza symptoms.

Based on homeopathic premises, I will guess that the manufacturer of the product in question added diluted onion because eating onions caused a prover's eyes to tear and nose to run, and perhaps histamines were added because histamines in the body can lead to upper respiratory allergy symptoms. Even if not diluted, I couldn't find any scientific evidence online that any of the listed ingredients can effectively treat sinus problems.

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I am not an authority on this matter but have explored the validity, or lack thereof, of homeopathy for about 10 years; the answers already provided are excellent, and here is my answer (from the USA):

Paraphrasing question #1: Can this product be harmful? In short, potentially yes. In the US, and similarly in other countries, homeopathy is exempt from the FDA's standard safety (and efficacy) requirements for medications, even as many of the active ingredients used in homeopathic remedies are purposely derived from dangerous if not deadly substances. In the remedy under discussion, for example, Nux Vomica contains high levels of strychnine (AKA "poison nut"), a dangerous neurotoxin. True, the active ingredients in this and most homeopathic products are so diluted that they are very unlikely to (and often cannot plausibly) cause either harm (or benefits), but that is only if the listed dilutions are accurate and if the product is not contaminated or adulterated. To illustrate my point, note that Hyland's teething tablets were recalled after a number of consumers' reported babies suffering symptoms consistent with Belladonna poisoning; the FDA issued a consumer alert and recall after finding inconsistent amounts of the poison in samples of the product and no child proof safety caps.

Not pertaining to the product under question, but the public should be aware that some OTC products labeled as "homeopathic" use relatively high concentrations of active ingredients, thus they can conceivably have a physiological effect -- including side-effects. E.g. Zicam's cold remedies used just a 1x dilution of zinc (one part zinc to 10 parts substrate) in their cold remedies resulted in hundreds of reports of permanent loss of smell. Products are exempt from many FDA safety regulations if they are claimed as "homeopathic."

Paraphrasing question #2: Assuming there are sufficient quantities to have a clinical effect after dilution, can any of these particular ingredients help with sinus problems? In short, very highly doubtful, given the dubious premises of homeopathy. Aside from believing that the heavy dilutions make remedies MORE potent, homeopathy makes another irrational assumption that "like cures like" (or law of similars). First, they use a highly subjective and unscientific process ironically called "provings" (more like testimonials) to fill a pharmacopeia of physical and mental symptoms that are assumed to be universal reactions to particular substances. Then, they use these substances, many of which are toxic-- after diluting them to render them harmless (let's hope!) -- as "active ingredients" to treat the listed symptoms. Underlying causes for the person's symptoms as irrelevant. Their "law" of similars can't be farther from what scientists regard as "laws" of nature. Ironically, many homeopaths reject vaccines, an actual example of "like cures like", while favoring instead, for example, ground duck liver and heart (giving it a sciency name, Oscillococcinum) diluted to non-existence to purportedly treat influenza. I will guess that the manufacturer of the product in question added diluted onion because eating onions caused a prover's eyes to tear and nose to run, and perhaps histamines were added because histamines in the body can lead to upper respiratory allergy symptoms. I couldn't find any scientific evidence online that any of the listed ingredients can effectively treat sinus problems.