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I think the biggest thing going on here is confirmation bias as opposed to any other phenomenon. There are thousands and thousands of musicians, and the "27 Club" has only 45 members (as defined by wikipedia, and going back to 1908). I think this particular phenomenon also has some hallmarks of the Birthday Paradox in that people will always have a specific age when they die. Naturally, some will have the same age. (This is a weak analogy, I am thinking of a better one, and am open to suggestions.)

I think what really drives people to the confirmation bias inherent in this is that 27 is a rather young age for anyone to die. To have musicians be very famous by that age, makes them stand out even more.

As for other people dying at 27, I think that you can list many other groups that have a much higher chance of dying. For instance, in the commercial sector, being a fisherman is the deadliest demographic as far as profession goes.

according to the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data, in 2006 it became in fact the deadliest job in the country with a fatality rate of 141.7. Fishers didn’t have the highest number of fatalities over all (51 reported fatalities in 2006) but due to the relatively small amount employed, it had the highest rate.

In terms of overall numbers, drivers/sales workers suffered by far the most on-the-job fatalities – 940 in 2006. The strong majority of these fatalities occurred among heavy truck drivers. Because of the large labor force of drivers, the fatality rate (27.2) was lower than for fishers.

Although, soldiers aren't mentioned. And of course, these are deaths due to accidents. Suicides, drug overdoses, and the like attributed to the "27 Club" are tracked under different methods (such as the CDC). In a cursory look at that data, it doesn't seem like there is anything particularly different about musicians.

As Jader mentions in the comments, the average death rate for people in the 25-34 age group is about 1.7%. Now look at the "27 Club" that is listed on Wikipedia. That's 45 of them in over 100 years! According to the labor bureau, there are currently 186,000 PROFESSIONAL musicians in the US for 2008, with a 10 year delta growth of just over 14,000. If anything, the 27 club seems to be UNDER represented on the wiki page if it can only find 45 in 100 years!

Also, consider that the http://www.the-eggman.com/writings/death_stats.html link gives deaths for the 25-34 age category under accidents at a higher 12% rate! I think it could be argued that most of those deaths also involved some level of "accident" such as overdose, suicide, etc. I refer you to the answer by Sklivvz.

I think the biggest thing going on here is confirmation bias as opposed to any other phenomenon. There are thousands and thousands of musicians, and the "27 Club" has only 45 members (as defined by wikipedia, and going back to 1908). I think this particular phenomenon also has some hallmarks of the Birthday Paradox in that people will always have a specific age when they die. Naturally, some will have the same age. (This is a weak analogy, I am thinking of a better one, and am open to suggestions.)

I think what really drives people to the confirmation bias inherent in this is that 27 is a rather young age for anyone to die. To have musicians be very famous by that age, makes them stand out even more.

As for other people dying at 27, I think that you can list many other groups that have a much higher chance of dying. For instance, in the commercial sector, being a fisherman is the deadliest demographic as far as profession goes.

according to the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data, in 2006 it became in fact the deadliest job in the country with a fatality rate of 141.7. Fishers didn’t have the highest number of fatalities over all (51 reported fatalities in 2006) but due to the relatively small amount employed, it had the highest rate.

In terms of overall numbers, drivers/sales workers suffered by far the most on-the-job fatalities – 940 in 2006. The strong majority of these fatalities occurred among heavy truck drivers. Because of the large labor force of drivers, the fatality rate (27.2) was lower than for fishers.

Although, soldiers aren't mentioned. And of course, these are deaths due to accidents. Suicides, drug overdoses, and the like attributed to the "27 Club" are tracked under different methods (such as the CDC). In a cursory look at that data, it doesn't seem like there is anything particularly different about musicians.

As Jader mentions in the comments, the average death rate for people in the 25-34 age group is about 1.7%. Now look at the "27 Club" that is listed on Wikipedia. That's 45 of them in over 100 years! According to the labor bureau, there are currently 186,000 PROFESSIONAL musicians in the US for 2008, with a 10 year delta growth of just over 14,000. If anything, the 27 club seems to be UNDER represented on the wiki page if it can only find 45 in 100 years!

Also, consider that the http://www.the-eggman.com/writings/death_stats.html link gives deaths for the 25-34 age category under accidents at a higher 12% rate! I think it could be argued that most of those deaths also involved some level of "accident" such as overdose, suicide, etc.

I think the biggest thing going on here is confirmation bias as opposed to any other phenomenon. There are thousands and thousands of musicians, and the "27 Club" has only 45 members (as defined by wikipedia, and going back to 1908). I think this particular phenomenon also has some hallmarks of the Birthday Paradox in that people will always have a specific age when they die. Naturally, some will have the same age. (This is a weak analogy, I am thinking of a better one, and am open to suggestions.)

I think what really drives people to the confirmation bias inherent in this is that 27 is a rather young age for anyone to die. To have musicians be very famous by that age, makes them stand out even more.

As for other people dying at 27, I think that you can list many other groups that have a much higher chance of dying. For instance, in the commercial sector, being a fisherman is the deadliest demographic as far as profession goes.

according to the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data, in 2006 it became in fact the deadliest job in the country with a fatality rate of 141.7. Fishers didn’t have the highest number of fatalities over all (51 reported fatalities in 2006) but due to the relatively small amount employed, it had the highest rate.

In terms of overall numbers, drivers/sales workers suffered by far the most on-the-job fatalities – 940 in 2006. The strong majority of these fatalities occurred among heavy truck drivers. Because of the large labor force of drivers, the fatality rate (27.2) was lower than for fishers.

Although, soldiers aren't mentioned. And of course, these are deaths due to accidents. Suicides, drug overdoses, and the like attributed to the "27 Club" are tracked under different methods (such as the CDC). In a cursory look at that data, it doesn't seem like there is anything particularly different about musicians.

As Jader mentions in the comments, the average death rate for people in the 25-34 age group is about 1.7%. Now look at the "27 Club" that is listed on Wikipedia. That's 45 of them in over 100 years! According to the labor bureau, there are currently 186,000 PROFESSIONAL musicians in the US for 2008, with a 10 year delta growth of just over 14,000. If anything, the 27 club seems to be UNDER represented on the wiki page if it can only find 45 in 100 years!

Also, consider that the http://www.the-eggman.com/writings/death_stats.html link gives deaths for the 25-34 age category under accidents at a higher 12% rate! I think it could be argued that most of those deaths also involved some level of "accident" such as overdose, suicide, etc. I refer you to the answer by Sklivvz.

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I think the biggest thing going on here is confirmation bias as opposed to any other phenomenon. There are thousands and thousands of musicians, and the "27 Club" has only 45 members (as defined by wikipedia, and going back to 1908). I think this particular phenomenon also has some hallmarks of the Birthday Paradox in that people will always have a specific age when they die. Naturally, some will have the same age. (This is a weak analogy, I am thinking of a better one, and am open to suggestions.)

I think what really drives people to the confirmation bias inherent in this is that 27 is a rather young age for anyone to die. To have musicians be very famous by that age, makes them stand out even more.

As for other people dying at 27, I think that you can list many other groups that have a much higher chance of dying. For instance, in the commercial sector, being a fisherman is the deadliest demographic as far as profession goes.

according to the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data, in 2006 it became in fact the deadliest job in the country with a fatality rate of 141.7. Fishers didn’t have the highest number of fatalities over all (51 reported fatalities in 2006) but due to the relatively small amount employed, it had the highest rate.

In terms of overall numbers, drivers/sales workers suffered by far the most on-the-job fatalities – 940 in 2006. The strong majority of these fatalities occurred among heavy truck drivers. Because of the large labor force of drivers, the fatality rate (27.2) was lower than for fishers.

Although, soldiers aren't mentioned. And of course, these are deaths due to accidents. Suicides, drug overdoses, and the like attributed to the "27 Club" are tracked under different methods (such as the CDC). In a cursory look at that data, it doesn't seem like there is anything particularly different about musicians.

As Jader mentions in the comments, the average death rate for people in the 25-34 age group is about 1.7%. Now look at the "27 Club" that is listed on Wikipedia. That's 45 of them in over 100 years! According to the labor bureau, there are currently 186,000 PROFESSIONAL musicians in the US for 2008, with a 10 year delta growth of just over 14,000. If anything, the 27 club seems to be UNDER represented on the wiki page if it can only find 45 in 100 years!

Also, consider that the http://www.the-eggman.com/writings/death_stats.html link gives deaths for the 25-34 age category under accidents at a higher 12% rate! I think it could be argued that most of those deaths also involved some level of "accident" such as overdose, suicide, etc.

I think the biggest thing going on here is confirmation bias as opposed to any other phenomenon. There are thousands and thousands of musicians, and the "27 Club" has only 45 members (as defined by wikipedia, and going back to 1908). I think this particular phenomenon also has some hallmarks of the Birthday Paradox in that people will always have a specific age when they die. Naturally, some will have the same age. (This is a weak analogy, I am thinking of a better one, and am open to suggestions.)

I think what really drives people to the confirmation bias inherent in this is that 27 is a rather young age for anyone to die. To have musicians be very famous by that age, makes them stand out even more.

As for other people dying at 27, I think that you can list many other groups that have a much higher chance of dying. For instance, in the commercial sector, being a fisherman is the deadliest demographic as far as profession goes.

according to the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data, in 2006 it became in fact the deadliest job in the country with a fatality rate of 141.7. Fishers didn’t have the highest number of fatalities over all (51 reported fatalities in 2006) but due to the relatively small amount employed, it had the highest rate.

In terms of overall numbers, drivers/sales workers suffered by far the most on-the-job fatalities – 940 in 2006. The strong majority of these fatalities occurred among heavy truck drivers. Because of the large labor force of drivers, the fatality rate (27.2) was lower than for fishers.

Although, soldiers aren't mentioned. And of course, these are deaths due to accidents. Suicides, drug overdoses, and the like attributed to the "27 Club" are tracked under different methods (such as the CDC). In a cursory look at that data, it doesn't seem like there is anything particularly different about musicians.

As Jader mentions in the comments, the average death rate for people in the 25-34 age group is about 1.7%. Now look at the "27 Club" that is listed on Wikipedia. That's 45 of them in over 100 years! According to the labor bureau, there are currently 186,000 PROFESSIONAL musicians in the US for 2008, with a 10 year delta growth of just over 14,000. If anything, the 27 club seems to be UNDER represented if it can only find 45 in 100 years!

I think the biggest thing going on here is confirmation bias as opposed to any other phenomenon. There are thousands and thousands of musicians, and the "27 Club" has only 45 members (as defined by wikipedia, and going back to 1908). I think this particular phenomenon also has some hallmarks of the Birthday Paradox in that people will always have a specific age when they die. Naturally, some will have the same age. (This is a weak analogy, I am thinking of a better one, and am open to suggestions.)

I think what really drives people to the confirmation bias inherent in this is that 27 is a rather young age for anyone to die. To have musicians be very famous by that age, makes them stand out even more.

As for other people dying at 27, I think that you can list many other groups that have a much higher chance of dying. For instance, in the commercial sector, being a fisherman is the deadliest demographic as far as profession goes.

according to the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data, in 2006 it became in fact the deadliest job in the country with a fatality rate of 141.7. Fishers didn’t have the highest number of fatalities over all (51 reported fatalities in 2006) but due to the relatively small amount employed, it had the highest rate.

In terms of overall numbers, drivers/sales workers suffered by far the most on-the-job fatalities – 940 in 2006. The strong majority of these fatalities occurred among heavy truck drivers. Because of the large labor force of drivers, the fatality rate (27.2) was lower than for fishers.

Although, soldiers aren't mentioned. And of course, these are deaths due to accidents. Suicides, drug overdoses, and the like attributed to the "27 Club" are tracked under different methods (such as the CDC). In a cursory look at that data, it doesn't seem like there is anything particularly different about musicians.

As Jader mentions in the comments, the average death rate for people in the 25-34 age group is about 1.7%. Now look at the "27 Club" that is listed on Wikipedia. That's 45 of them in over 100 years! According to the labor bureau, there are currently 186,000 PROFESSIONAL musicians in the US for 2008, with a 10 year delta growth of just over 14,000. If anything, the 27 club seems to be UNDER represented on the wiki page if it can only find 45 in 100 years!

Also, consider that the http://www.the-eggman.com/writings/death_stats.html link gives deaths for the 25-34 age category under accidents at a higher 12% rate! I think it could be argued that most of those deaths also involved some level of "accident" such as overdose, suicide, etc.

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I think the biggest thing going on here is confirmation bias as opposed to any other phenomenon. There are thousands and thousands of musicians, and the "27 Club" has only 45 members (as defined by wikipedia, and going back to 1908). I think this particular phenomenon also has some hallmarks of the Birthday Paradox in that people will always have a specific age when they die. Naturally, some will have the same age. (This is a weak analogy, I am thinking of a better one, and am open to suggestions.)

I think what really drives people to the confirmation bias inherent in this is that 27 is a rather young age for anyone to die. To have musicians be very famous by that age, makes them stand out even more.

As for other people dying at 27, I think that you can list many other groups that have a much higher chance of dying. For instance, in the commercial sector, being a fisherman is the deadliest demographic as far as profession goes.

according to the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data, in 2006 it became in fact the deadliest job in the country with a fatality rate of 141.7. Fishers didn’t have the highest number of fatalities over all (51 reported fatalities in 2006) but due to the relatively small amount employed, it had the highest rate.

In terms of overall numbers, drivers/sales workers suffered by far the most on-the-job fatalities – 940 in 2006. The strong majority of these fatalities occurred among heavy truck drivers. Because of the large labor force of drivers, the fatality rate (27.2) was lower than for fishers.

Although, soldiers aren't mentioned. And of course, these are deaths due to accidents. Suicides, drug overdoses, and the like attributed to the "27 Club" are tracked under different methods (such as the CDC). In a cursory look at that data, it doesn't seem like there is anything particularly different about musicians.

As Jader mentions in the comments, the average death rate for people in the 25-34 age group is about 1.7%. Now look at the "27 Club" that is listed on Wikipedia. That's 45 of them in over 100 years! According to the labor bureau, there are currently 186,000 PROFESSIONAL musicians in the US for 2008, with a 10 year delta growth of just over 14,000. If anything, the 27 club seems to be UNDER represented if it can only find 45 in 100 years!

I think the biggest thing going on here is confirmation bias as opposed to any other phenomenon. There are thousands and thousands of musicians, and the "27 Club" has only 45 members (as defined by wikipedia, and going back to 1908). I think this particular phenomenon also has some hallmarks of the Birthday Paradox in that people will always have a specific age when they die. Naturally, some will have the same age. (This is a weak analogy, I am thinking of a better one, and am open to suggestions.)

I think what really drives people to the confirmation bias inherent in this is that 27 is a rather young age for anyone to die. To have musicians be very famous by that age, makes them stand out even more.

As for other people dying at 27, I think that you can list many other groups that have a much higher chance of dying. For instance, in the commercial sector, being a fisherman is the deadliest demographic as far as profession goes.

according to the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data, in 2006 it became in fact the deadliest job in the country with a fatality rate of 141.7. Fishers didn’t have the highest number of fatalities over all (51 reported fatalities in 2006) but due to the relatively small amount employed, it had the highest rate.

In terms of overall numbers, drivers/sales workers suffered by far the most on-the-job fatalities – 940 in 2006. The strong majority of these fatalities occurred among heavy truck drivers. Because of the large labor force of drivers, the fatality rate (27.2) was lower than for fishers.

Although, soldiers aren't mentioned. And of course, these are deaths due to accidents. Suicides, drug overdoses, and the like attributed to the "27 Club" are tracked under different methods (such as the CDC). In a cursory look at that data, it doesn't seem like there is anything particularly different about musicians.

I think the biggest thing going on here is confirmation bias as opposed to any other phenomenon. There are thousands and thousands of musicians, and the "27 Club" has only 45 members (as defined by wikipedia, and going back to 1908). I think this particular phenomenon also has some hallmarks of the Birthday Paradox in that people will always have a specific age when they die. Naturally, some will have the same age. (This is a weak analogy, I am thinking of a better one, and am open to suggestions.)

I think what really drives people to the confirmation bias inherent in this is that 27 is a rather young age for anyone to die. To have musicians be very famous by that age, makes them stand out even more.

As for other people dying at 27, I think that you can list many other groups that have a much higher chance of dying. For instance, in the commercial sector, being a fisherman is the deadliest demographic as far as profession goes.

according to the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data, in 2006 it became in fact the deadliest job in the country with a fatality rate of 141.7. Fishers didn’t have the highest number of fatalities over all (51 reported fatalities in 2006) but due to the relatively small amount employed, it had the highest rate.

In terms of overall numbers, drivers/sales workers suffered by far the most on-the-job fatalities – 940 in 2006. The strong majority of these fatalities occurred among heavy truck drivers. Because of the large labor force of drivers, the fatality rate (27.2) was lower than for fishers.

Although, soldiers aren't mentioned. And of course, these are deaths due to accidents. Suicides, drug overdoses, and the like attributed to the "27 Club" are tracked under different methods (such as the CDC). In a cursory look at that data, it doesn't seem like there is anything particularly different about musicians.

As Jader mentions in the comments, the average death rate for people in the 25-34 age group is about 1.7%. Now look at the "27 Club" that is listed on Wikipedia. That's 45 of them in over 100 years! According to the labor bureau, there are currently 186,000 PROFESSIONAL musicians in the US for 2008, with a 10 year delta growth of just over 14,000. If anything, the 27 club seems to be UNDER represented if it can only find 45 in 100 years!

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