3 added 76 characters in body
source | link

I don't know about research as such, but acording to 'Get Thru' (a New Zealand Civil Defence website) doorways aren't the best bet, and it's better to get underneath a sturdy piece of furniture:

SAFE PLACES IN AN EARTHQUAKE Somewhere close to you, no more than a few steps or less than three metres away, to avoid injury from flying debris.

Under a strong table. Hold on to the table legs to keep it from moving away from you.

Next to an interior wall, away from windows that can shatter and cause injury and tall furniture that can fall on you. Protect your head and neck with your arms.

Keep in mind that in modern homes, doorways are no stronger than any other part of the structure and usually have doors that can swing and injure you.

EDIT since the question has changed a little. I don't know of any research directly in this area, but every expert earthquake saftey organisation I've seen explicitly says no to doorways and yes to "drop cover and hold on" (1,2,3,4[pdf],5)

With regards to the 'triangle of life', New Zealand Cival Defence says

'Drop, cover and hold' is the official advice of the New Zealand Government developed collaboratively with expert agencies such as GNS Science, EQC and the Society of Earthquake Engineers

and cites [PetalPetal (1999)  pdf[pdf] as a source for how wrong the triangle of life is.

I don't know about research as such, but acording to 'Get Thru' (a New Zealand Civil Defence website) doorways aren't the best bet, and it's better to get underneath a sturdy piece of furniture:

SAFE PLACES IN AN EARTHQUAKE Somewhere close to you, no more than a few steps or less than three metres away, to avoid injury from flying debris.

Under a strong table. Hold on to the table legs to keep it from moving away from you.

Next to an interior wall, away from windows that can shatter and cause injury and tall furniture that can fall on you. Protect your head and neck with your arms.

Keep in mind that in modern homes, doorways are no stronger than any other part of the structure and usually have doors that can swing and injure you.

EDIT since the question has changed a little. I don't know of any research directly in this area, but every expert earthquake saftey organisation I've seen explicitly says no to doorways and yes to "drop cover and hold on" (1,2,3,4[pdf])

With regards to the 'triangle of life', New Zealand Cival Defence says

'Drop, cover and hold' is the official advice of the New Zealand Government developed collaboratively with expert agencies such as GNS Science, EQC and the Society of Earthquake Engineers

and cites [Petal (1999)pdf as a source for how wrong the triangle of life is.

I don't know about research as such, but acording to 'Get Thru' (a New Zealand Civil Defence website) doorways aren't the best bet, and it's better to get underneath a sturdy piece of furniture:

SAFE PLACES IN AN EARTHQUAKE Somewhere close to you, no more than a few steps or less than three metres away, to avoid injury from flying debris.

Under a strong table. Hold on to the table legs to keep it from moving away from you.

Next to an interior wall, away from windows that can shatter and cause injury and tall furniture that can fall on you. Protect your head and neck with your arms.

Keep in mind that in modern homes, doorways are no stronger than any other part of the structure and usually have doors that can swing and injure you.

EDIT since the question has changed a little. I don't know of any research directly in this area, but every expert earthquake saftey organisation I've seen explicitly says no to doorways and yes to "drop cover and hold on" (1,2,3,4[pdf],5)

With regards to the 'triangle of life', New Zealand Cival Defence says

'Drop, cover and hold' is the official advice of the New Zealand Government developed collaboratively with expert agencies such as GNS Science, EQC and the Society of Earthquake Engineers

and cites Petal (1999)  [pdf] as a source for how wrong the triangle of life is.

2 added 1416 characters in body
source | link

I don't know about research as such, but acording to 'Get Thru' (a New Zealand Civil Defence website) doorways aren't the best bet, and it's better to get underneath a sturdy piece of furniture:

SAFE PLACES IN AN EARTHQUAKE Somewhere close to you, no more than a few steps or less than three metres away, to avoid injury from flying debris.

Under a strong table. Hold on to the table legs to keep it from moving away from you.

Next to an interior wall, away from windows that can shatter and cause injury and tall furniture that can fall on you. Protect your head and neck with your arms.

Keep in mind that in modern homes, doorways are no stronger than any other part of the structure and usually have doors that can swing and injure you.

EDIT since the question has changed a little. I don't know of any research directly in this area, but every expert earthquake saftey organisation I've seen explicitly says no to doorways and yes to "drop cover and hold on" (1,2,3,4[pdf])

With regards to the 'triangle of life', New Zealand Cival Defence says

'Drop, cover and hold' is the official advice of the New Zealand Government developed collaboratively with expert agencies such as GNS Science, EQC and the Society of Earthquake Engineers

and cites [Petal (1999)pdf as a source for how wrong the triangle of life is.

I don't know about research as such, but acording to 'Get Thru' (a New Zealand Civil Defence website) doorways aren't the best bet, and it's better to get underneath a sturdy piece of furniture:

SAFE PLACES IN AN EARTHQUAKE Somewhere close to you, no more than a few steps or less than three metres away, to avoid injury from flying debris.

Under a strong table. Hold on to the table legs to keep it from moving away from you.

Next to an interior wall, away from windows that can shatter and cause injury and tall furniture that can fall on you. Protect your head and neck with your arms.

Keep in mind that in modern homes, doorways are no stronger than any other part of the structure and usually have doors that can swing and injure you.

I don't know about research as such, but acording to 'Get Thru' (a New Zealand Civil Defence website) doorways aren't the best bet, and it's better to get underneath a sturdy piece of furniture:

SAFE PLACES IN AN EARTHQUAKE Somewhere close to you, no more than a few steps or less than three metres away, to avoid injury from flying debris.

Under a strong table. Hold on to the table legs to keep it from moving away from you.

Next to an interior wall, away from windows that can shatter and cause injury and tall furniture that can fall on you. Protect your head and neck with your arms.

Keep in mind that in modern homes, doorways are no stronger than any other part of the structure and usually have doors that can swing and injure you.

EDIT since the question has changed a little. I don't know of any research directly in this area, but every expert earthquake saftey organisation I've seen explicitly says no to doorways and yes to "drop cover and hold on" (1,2,3,4[pdf])

With regards to the 'triangle of life', New Zealand Cival Defence says

'Drop, cover and hold' is the official advice of the New Zealand Government developed collaboratively with expert agencies such as GNS Science, EQC and the Society of Earthquake Engineers

and cites [Petal (1999)pdf as a source for how wrong the triangle of life is.

1
source | link

I don't know about research as such, but acording to 'Get Thru' (a New Zealand Civil Defence website) doorways aren't the best bet, and it's better to get underneath a sturdy piece of furniture:

SAFE PLACES IN AN EARTHQUAKE Somewhere close to you, no more than a few steps or less than three metres away, to avoid injury from flying debris.

Under a strong table. Hold on to the table legs to keep it from moving away from you.

Next to an interior wall, away from windows that can shatter and cause injury and tall furniture that can fall on you. Protect your head and neck with your arms.

Keep in mind that in modern homes, doorways are no stronger than any other part of the structure and usually have doors that can swing and injure you.