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Yes, individual bussesbuses are rediculouslyridiculously less efficient than cars. A Santa Barbara study (link blatanlyblatantly stolen from Wiki) showed them to have a MPG rating between 4.8 and 6.0. This is obviously far worse than even the evil hummer.

Cars average something in the mid-20s MPG (according to bts.gov). In order to be more fuel efficient than individual cars, bussesbuses need to be carrying on-average 4-6 cars worth of people. I'm not finding any good statistics on the average number of people per car in US cities, and that's obviously needed to determine the "break-even point" for bussesbuses.

You also need to factor in the movement of the bus from parking spot to its route (not an issue for individual's cars), and include that time in the "average" vs the number of passengers.

Yes, individual busses are rediculously less efficient than cars. A Santa Barbara study (link blatanly stolen from Wiki) showed them to have a MPG rating between 4.8 and 6.0. This is obviously far worse than even the evil hummer.

Cars average something in the mid-20s MPG (according to bts.gov). In order to be more fuel efficient than individual cars, busses need to be carrying on-average 4-6 cars worth of people. I'm not finding any good statistics on the average number of people per car in US cities, and that's obviously needed to determine the "break-even point" for busses.

You also need to factor in the movement of the bus from parking spot to its route (not an issue for individual's cars), and include that time in the "average" vs the number of passengers.

Yes, individual buses are ridiculously less efficient than cars. A Santa Barbara study (link blatantly stolen from Wiki) showed them to have a MPG rating between 4.8 and 6.0. This is obviously far worse than even the evil hummer.

Cars average something in the mid-20s MPG (according to bts.gov). In order to be more fuel efficient than individual cars, buses need to be carrying on-average 4-6 cars worth of people. I'm not finding any good statistics on the average number of people per car in US cities, and that's obviously needed to determine the "break-even point" for buses.

You also need to factor in the movement of the bus from parking spot to its route (not an issue for individual's cars), and include that time in the "average" vs the number of passengers.

3 added 306 characters in body
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Yes, individual busses are rediculously less efficient than cars. A Santa Barbara study (link blatanly stolen from Wiki) showed them to have a MPG rating between 4.8 and 6.0. This is obviously far worse than even the evil hummer.

InCars average something in the mid-20s MPG (according to bts.gov). In order to be more fuel efficient than individual cars, theybusses need to be carrying on-average 4-6 cars worth of people. I'm not adjusting for emissions differences between cars and busses, or being particularly carefulfinding any good statistics on the average number of people per car in US cities, and that's obviously needed to determine the "break-sideeven point" for busses. 

You also need to factor in the movement of the bus from parking spot to its route (not an issue for individual's cars), and include that time in the "average" vs the number of passengers.

Yes, individual busses are rediculously less efficient than cars. A Santa Barbara study (link blatanly stolen from Wiki) showed them to have a MPG rating between 4.8 and 6.0. This is obviously far worse than even the evil hummer.

In order to be more fuel efficient than individual cars, they need to be carrying on-average 4-6 people. I'm not adjusting for emissions differences between cars and busses, or being particularly careful on the car-side. You also need to factor in the movement of the bus from parking spot to its route (not an issue for individual's cars).

Yes, individual busses are rediculously less efficient than cars. A Santa Barbara study (link blatanly stolen from Wiki) showed them to have a MPG rating between 4.8 and 6.0. This is obviously far worse than even the evil hummer.

Cars average something in the mid-20s MPG (according to bts.gov). In order to be more fuel efficient than individual cars, busses need to be carrying on-average 4-6 cars worth of people. I'm not finding any good statistics on the average number of people per car in US cities, and that's obviously needed to determine the "break-even point" for busses. 

You also need to factor in the movement of the bus from parking spot to its route (not an issue for individual's cars), and include that time in the "average" vs the number of passengers.

2 deleted 5 characters in body
source | link

Yes, individual busses are rediculously less efficient than cars. A Santa Barbara study (link blatanly stolen from Wiki) showed them to have a MPG rating between 4.8 and 6.0. This is obviously far worse than even the evil hummer.

In order to be more fuel efficient than individual cars, they need to be carrying on-average 4-6 people. I'm not adjusting for emissions differences between cars and busses, or being particularly careful on the car-side. You also need to factor in the movement of the bus from it's parking spot to its route (not an issue for individual's cars).

Yes, individual busses are rediculously less efficient than cars. A Santa Barbara study (link blatanly stolen from Wiki) showed them to have a MPG rating between 4.8 and 6.0. This is obviously far worse than even the evil hummer.

In order to be more fuel efficient than individual cars, they need to be carrying on-average 4-6 people. I'm not adjusting for emissions differences between cars and busses, or being particularly careful on the car-side. You also need to factor in the movement of the bus from it's parking spot to its route (not an issue for individual's cars).

Yes, individual busses are rediculously less efficient than cars. A Santa Barbara study (link blatanly stolen from Wiki) showed them to have a MPG rating between 4.8 and 6.0. This is obviously far worse than even the evil hummer.

In order to be more fuel efficient than individual cars, they need to be carrying on-average 4-6 people. I'm not adjusting for emissions differences between cars and busses, or being particularly careful on the car-side. You also need to factor in the movement of the bus from parking spot to its route (not an issue for individual's cars).

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