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Is this a real tradition of Do any people in South Africa traditionally spend two days together praising wrong-doers to help them?

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I have seen variations on the following meme posted by many of my friends on Facebook:

https://me.me/i/ubuntu-in-certain-regions-of-south-africa-when-someone-does-4931579

In certain regions of South Africa, when someone does something wrong, he is taken to the center of the village and surrounded by his tribe for two days while they speak of all the good he has done. They believe each person is good, yet sometimes we make mistakes, which is really a cry for help. They unite in this ritual to encourage the person to reconnect with his true nature. The belief is that unity and affirmation have more power to change behavior than shame and punishment. This is known as Ubuntu — humanity towards others.

All of the memes share the same story: Some tribes in South Africa have the tradition of dealing with wrong-doing by putting the wrong-doer in the center of town for two days, while the people of the town remind that person of how they have been good in the past, reminding them of their true nature. Then they are reintegrated into the tribe.

According to

https://jmcsmith.co.uk/2012/12/06/maasai-bemba-african-the-same/

this is claimed to be a first hand observation by the author in following book in the book Contact: The First Four Minutes Contact: The First Four Minutes, by psychiatrist Leonard Zunin.

Aside from this one account, I have been unable to find documentation of this practice anywhere online. Is this a real cultural practice of some tribes in South Africa?

I have seen variations on the following meme posted by many of my friends on Facebook:

https://me.me/i/ubuntu-in-certain-regions-of-south-africa-when-someone-does-4931579

All of the memes share the same story: Some tribes in South Africa have the tradition of dealing with wrong-doing by putting the wrong-doer in the center of town for two days, while the people of the town remind that person of how they have been good in the past, reminding them of their true nature. Then they are reintegrated into the tribe.

According to

https://jmcsmith.co.uk/2012/12/06/maasai-bemba-african-the-same/

this is claimed to be a first hand observation by the author in following book in the book Contact: The First Four Minutes, by psychiatrist Leonard Zunin.

Aside from this one account, I have been unable to find documentation of this practice anywhere online. Is this a real cultural practice of some tribes in South Africa?

I have seen variations on the following meme posted by many of my friends on Facebook:

https://me.me/i/ubuntu-in-certain-regions-of-south-africa-when-someone-does-4931579

In certain regions of South Africa, when someone does something wrong, he is taken to the center of the village and surrounded by his tribe for two days while they speak of all the good he has done. They believe each person is good, yet sometimes we make mistakes, which is really a cry for help. They unite in this ritual to encourage the person to reconnect with his true nature. The belief is that unity and affirmation have more power to change behavior than shame and punishment. This is known as Ubuntu — humanity towards others.

All of the memes share the same story: Some tribes in South Africa have the tradition of dealing with wrong-doing by putting the wrong-doer in the center of town for two days, while the people of the town remind that person of how they have been good in the past, reminding them of their true nature. Then they are reintegrated into the tribe.

According to

https://jmcsmith.co.uk/2012/12/06/maasai-bemba-african-the-same/

this is claimed to be a first hand observation by the author in following book in the book Contact: The First Four Minutes, by psychiatrist Leonard Zunin.

Aside from this one account, I have been unable to find documentation of this practice anywhere online. Is this a real cultural practice of some tribes in South Africa?

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