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Mining uranium isn't good for your health.

It has been estimated that 500 to 600 of the thousands of uranium miners who worked between 1950 and 1990 died of lung cancer, that most of these deaths were associated with radon exposure, and that a similar number would die after 1990.42 A 2000 study of Navajo miners reports that there were 94 lung cancer deaths documented from 1969 to 1993, that 63 of these individuals were former uranium miners, and that uranium miners had a relative risk of 28.6 compared with controls.59 Frank Gilliland et al. point out that this appears to be a “unique example of exposure in a single occupation accounting for the majority of lung cancers in an entire population.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3222290/

The single biggest case of deaths directly related to radon exposure in Canada happened as far back as the 1970s and 1980s, when at least 220 miners in Elliot Lake, Ontario died of lung cancer from years of exposure in the town’s uranium mines.

The Elliot Lake tragedy ultimately compelled the United Steelworkers union to go on strike in 1974. The result led to the appointment of the Ham Commission, which helped pass one of the most significant pieces of worker health and safety legislation in Ontario five years later with the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

Dangers of exposure

Under the terms of the Act, the Workers Safety Insurance Board of Ontario (WSIB) accepted the claims of the 220 miners based on the hazardous working conditions in the mines. The Steelworkers union believes the true number of deaths is actually much higher, based on its knowledge of those who were thought to have suffered from exposure, and the number of actual claims filed with the WSIB. Their plight helped sound the alarm about the dangers of the invisible and odourless gas, which quietly damages the lungs over years of exposure.

http://www.personalhealthnews.ca/news/learning-from-the-past-reflecting-on-the-radon-tragedy-in-elliot-lake

Specifically, extant literature on Grants miners has found that about 52.4% of the NMSMI identified miner population over 1957–1976 were unique.24 Using this data, I estimated that 38 754 unique miners worked in Grants between 1955 and 1990. Therefore, approximately (73 903–38 754) = 35 149 miners were the same miner being counted twice or more in the NMSMI data. The sensitivity of the final results to the choice of this point estimate is examined at the end of the paper.

Excess exposure-related lung cancer deaths were estimated at 550.5 miners for the period 1955–1990, or 134.9 between 1955 and 1970 and 415.6 between 1971 and 1990. In standardized terms, excess lung cancer mortality over the entire mining period was 2185.4 per 100 000 miners. This was approximately 1.4% of the unique Grants miner population who worked over 1955–1990, or about 2.2% of the unique miner population who worked >6 months over the same time period. Results are significantly lower than comparable studies on Colorado Plateau uranium miners, where the most recent excess lung cancer mortality estimate is 13 052.8 per 100 000 miners.52

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4164879/

Deaths due to accident, Emphysema, Tuberculosis, and Pneumoconiosis were also much higher than expected. here

When trying to come up with a total for the North American continent for deaths attributed to producing nuclear weapon feedstock, numbers like 20,000 get bandied about.

Mining uranium isn't good for your health.

It has been estimated that 500 to 600 of the thousands of uranium miners who worked between 1950 and 1990 died of lung cancer, that most of these deaths were associated with radon exposure, and that a similar number would die after 1990.42 A 2000 study of Navajo miners reports that there were 94 lung cancer deaths documented from 1969 to 1993, that 63 of these individuals were former uranium miners, and that uranium miners had a relative risk of 28.6 compared with controls.59 Frank Gilliland et al. point out that this appears to be a “unique example of exposure in a single occupation accounting for the majority of lung cancers in an entire population.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3222290/

The single biggest case of deaths directly related to radon exposure in Canada happened as far back as the 1970s and 1980s, when at least 220 miners in Elliot Lake, Ontario died of lung cancer from years of exposure in the town’s uranium mines.

The Elliot Lake tragedy ultimately compelled the United Steelworkers union to go on strike in 1974. The result led to the appointment of the Ham Commission, which helped pass one of the most significant pieces of worker health and safety legislation in Ontario five years later with the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

Dangers of exposure

Under the terms of the Act, the Workers Safety Insurance Board of Ontario (WSIB) accepted the claims of the 220 miners based on the hazardous working conditions in the mines. The Steelworkers union believes the true number of deaths is actually much higher, based on its knowledge of those who were thought to have suffered from exposure, and the number of actual claims filed with the WSIB. Their plight helped sound the alarm about the dangers of the invisible and odourless gas, which quietly damages the lungs over years of exposure.

http://www.personalhealthnews.ca/news/learning-from-the-past-reflecting-on-the-radon-tragedy-in-elliot-lake

Specifically, extant literature on Grants miners has found that about 52.4% of the NMSMI identified miner population over 1957–1976 were unique.24 Using this data, I estimated that 38 754 unique miners worked in Grants between 1955 and 1990. Therefore, approximately (73 903–38 754) = 35 149 miners were the same miner being counted twice or more in the NMSMI data. The sensitivity of the final results to the choice of this point estimate is examined at the end of the paper.

Excess exposure-related lung cancer deaths were estimated at 550.5 miners for the period 1955–1990, or 134.9 between 1955 and 1970 and 415.6 between 1971 and 1990. In standardized terms, excess lung cancer mortality over the entire mining period was 2185.4 per 100 000 miners. This was approximately 1.4% of the unique Grants miner population who worked over 1955–1990, or about 2.2% of the unique miner population who worked >6 months over the same time period. Results are significantly lower than comparable studies on Colorado Plateau uranium miners, where the most recent excess lung cancer mortality estimate is 13 052.8 per 100 000 miners.52

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4164879/

When trying to come up with a total for the North American continent for deaths attributed to producing nuclear weapon feedstock, numbers like 20,000 get bandied about.

Mining uranium isn't good for your health.

It has been estimated that 500 to 600 of the thousands of uranium miners who worked between 1950 and 1990 died of lung cancer, that most of these deaths were associated with radon exposure, and that a similar number would die after 1990.42 A 2000 study of Navajo miners reports that there were 94 lung cancer deaths documented from 1969 to 1993, that 63 of these individuals were former uranium miners, and that uranium miners had a relative risk of 28.6 compared with controls.59 Frank Gilliland et al. point out that this appears to be a “unique example of exposure in a single occupation accounting for the majority of lung cancers in an entire population.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3222290/

The single biggest case of deaths directly related to radon exposure in Canada happened as far back as the 1970s and 1980s, when at least 220 miners in Elliot Lake, Ontario died of lung cancer from years of exposure in the town’s uranium mines.

The Elliot Lake tragedy ultimately compelled the United Steelworkers union to go on strike in 1974. The result led to the appointment of the Ham Commission, which helped pass one of the most significant pieces of worker health and safety legislation in Ontario five years later with the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

Dangers of exposure

Under the terms of the Act, the Workers Safety Insurance Board of Ontario (WSIB) accepted the claims of the 220 miners based on the hazardous working conditions in the mines. The Steelworkers union believes the true number of deaths is actually much higher, based on its knowledge of those who were thought to have suffered from exposure, and the number of actual claims filed with the WSIB. Their plight helped sound the alarm about the dangers of the invisible and odourless gas, which quietly damages the lungs over years of exposure.

http://www.personalhealthnews.ca/news/learning-from-the-past-reflecting-on-the-radon-tragedy-in-elliot-lake

Specifically, extant literature on Grants miners has found that about 52.4% of the NMSMI identified miner population over 1957–1976 were unique.24 Using this data, I estimated that 38 754 unique miners worked in Grants between 1955 and 1990. Therefore, approximately (73 903–38 754) = 35 149 miners were the same miner being counted twice or more in the NMSMI data. The sensitivity of the final results to the choice of this point estimate is examined at the end of the paper.

Excess exposure-related lung cancer deaths were estimated at 550.5 miners for the period 1955–1990, or 134.9 between 1955 and 1970 and 415.6 between 1971 and 1990. In standardized terms, excess lung cancer mortality over the entire mining period was 2185.4 per 100 000 miners. This was approximately 1.4% of the unique Grants miner population who worked over 1955–1990, or about 2.2% of the unique miner population who worked >6 months over the same time period. Results are significantly lower than comparable studies on Colorado Plateau uranium miners, where the most recent excess lung cancer mortality estimate is 13 052.8 per 100 000 miners.52

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4164879/

Deaths due to accident, Emphysema, Tuberculosis, and Pneumoconiosis were also much higher than expected. here

When trying to come up with a total for the North American continent for deaths attributed to producing nuclear weapon feedstock, numbers like 20,000 get bandied about.

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Mining uranium isn't good for your health.

It has been estimated that 500 to 600 of the thousands of uranium miners who worked between 1950 and 1990 died of lung cancer, that most of these deaths were associated with radon exposure, and that a similar number would die after 1990.42 A 2000 study of Navajo miners reports that there were 94 lung cancer deaths documented from 1969 to 1993, that 63 of these individuals were former uranium miners, and that uranium miners had a relative risk of 28.6 compared with controls.59 Frank Gilliland et al. point out that this appears to be a “unique example of exposure in a single occupation accounting for the majority of lung cancers in an entire population.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3222290/

The single biggest case of deaths directly related to radon exposure in Canada happened as far back as the 1970s and 1980s, when at least 220 miners in Elliot Lake, Ontario died of lung cancer from years of exposure in the town’s uranium mines.

The Elliot Lake tragedy ultimately compelled the United Steelworkers union to go on strike in 1974. The result led to the appointment of the Ham Commission, which helped pass one of the most significant pieces of worker health and safety legislation in Ontario five years later with the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

Dangers of exposure

Under the terms of the Act, the Workers Safety Insurance Board of Ontario (WSIB) accepted the claims of the 220 miners based on the hazardous working conditions in the mines. The Steelworkers union believes the true number of deaths is actually much higher, based on its knowledge of those who were thought to have suffered from exposure, and the number of actual claims filed with the WSIB. Their plight helped sound the alarm about the dangers of the invisible and odourless gas, which quietly damages the lungs over years of exposure.

http://www.personalhealthnews.ca/news/learning-from-the-past-reflecting-on-the-radon-tragedy-in-elliot-lake

Specifically, extant literature on Grants miners has found that about 52.4% of the NMSMI identified miner population over 1957–1976 were unique.24 Using this data, I estimated that 38 754 unique miners worked in Grants between 1955 and 1990. Therefore, approximately (73 903–38 754) = 35 149 miners were the same miner being counted twice or more in the NMSMI data. The sensitivity of the final results to the choice of this point estimate is examined at the end of the paper.

Excess exposure-related lung cancer deaths were estimated at 550.5 miners for the period 1955–1990, or 134.9 between 1955 and 1970 and 415.6 between 1971 and 1990. In standardized terms, excess lung cancer mortality over the entire mining period was 2185.4 per 100 000 miners. This was approximately 1.4% of the unique Grants miner population who worked over 1955–1990, or about 2.2% of the unique miner population who worked >6 months over the same time period. Results are significantly lower than comparable studies on Colorado Plateau uranium miners, where the most recent excess lung cancer mortality estimate is 13 052.8 per 100 000 miners.52

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4164879/

When trying to come up with a total for the North American continent for deaths attributed to producing nuclear weapon feedstock, numbers like 20,000 get bandied about.