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Tools of War: History of Weapons in Modern Times by Syed Ramsey claims that there was a 2011 BBC documentary stating numbers of 9000 killed in attacks, with 12000 forced laborers and concentration camp prisoners killed in production.

There's also A BBC News Magazine article stating that 9000 number directly. It mentions a mountain-factory in Germany that had 60,000 slave laborers - making the "forced laborer" death toll at least plausible, given how the Nazis were running things. It also notes that the V2 would have been much more effective if it had not been shut down so thoroughly by allied bombing.

Finally, the Daily Mail website states both numbers directly... for what that's worth. They may just be following along with the oft-referenced BBC numbers, but they have a number of other statistics that are not so broadly spread, so possibly not.

On something like "historical data on the V2 Rocket" I really don't think you're going to get much better than the BBC. It seems at least likely that there were more lives lost among the workers during production than there were lost to the attacks themselves. There is some potential for confusion, however. The workers were in a concentration camp environment, and there are some fuzzy questions about whether they'd all count. (Does it count if they're summarily executed while working? What about if that execution is intended primarily to motivate their fellows?)

I do not have an answer to the other, and I'm not convinced that it is answerable if true. Proving a negative is really very difficult at the best of times, and proving a negative in a matter of historical footnote is much moreso. It also somewhat depends on your definition of "weapon" - specifically in how distinct it has to be in order to not just get grouped in with other weapons of the same type. If a very specific make and model of cannon had some horrible laboratory accident, only produced one instance, and then had that instance spiked after being fired but without managing to do much damage, I can totally imagine that it would fit the answer... but I doubt it would be easy to find.

Tools of War: History of Weapons in Modern Times by Syed Ramsey claims that there was a 2011 BBC documentary stating numbers of 9000 killed in attacks, with 12000 forced laborers and concentration camp prisoners killed in production.

There's also A BBC News Magazine article stating that 9000 number directly. It mentions a mountain-factory in Germany that had 60,000 slave laborers - making the "forced laborer" death toll at least plausible, given how the Nazis were running things. It also notes that the V2 would have been much more effective if it had not been shut down so thoroughly by allied bombing.

Finally, the Daily Mail website states both numbers directly... for what that's worth. They may just be following along with the oft-referenced BBC numbers, but they have a number of other statistics that are not so broadly spread, so possibly not.

I do not have an answer to the other, and I'm not convinced that it is answerable if true. Proving a negative is really very difficult at the best of times, and proving a negative in a matter of historical footnote is much moreso. It also somewhat depends on your definition of "weapon" - specifically in how distinct it has to be in order to not just get grouped in with other weapons of the same type. If a very specific make and model of cannon had some horrible laboratory accident, only produced one instance, and then had that instance spiked after being fired but without managing to do much damage, I can totally imagine that it would fit the answer... but I doubt it would be easy to find.

Tools of War: History of Weapons in Modern Times by Syed Ramsey claims that there was a 2011 BBC documentary stating numbers of 9000 killed in attacks, with 12000 forced laborers and concentration camp prisoners killed in production.

There's also A BBC News Magazine article stating that 9000 number directly. It mentions a mountain-factory in Germany that had 60,000 slave laborers - making the "forced laborer" death toll at least plausible, given how the Nazis were running things. It also notes that the V2 would have been much more effective if it had not been shut down so thoroughly by allied bombing.

Finally, the Daily Mail website states both numbers directly... for what that's worth. They may just be following along with the oft-referenced BBC numbers, but they have a number of other statistics that are not so broadly spread, so possibly not.

On something like "historical data on the V2 Rocket" I really don't think you're going to get much better than the BBC. It seems at least likely that there were more lives lost among the workers during production than there were lost to the attacks themselves. There is some potential for confusion, however. The workers were in a concentration camp environment, and there are some fuzzy questions about whether they'd all count. (Does it count if they're summarily executed while working? What about if that execution is intended primarily to motivate their fellows?)

I do not have an answer to the other, and I'm not convinced that it is answerable if true. Proving a negative is really very difficult at the best of times, and proving a negative in a matter of historical footnote is much moreso. It also somewhat depends on your definition of "weapon" - specifically in how distinct it has to be in order to not just get grouped in with other weapons of the same type. If a very specific make and model of cannon had some horrible laboratory accident, only produced one instance, and then had that instance spiked after being fired but without managing to do much damage, I can totally imagine that it would fit the answer... but I doubt it would be easy to find.

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Tools of War: History of Weapons in Modern Times by Syed Ramsey claims that there was a 2011 BBC documentary stating numbers of 9000 killed in attacks, with 12000 forced laborers and concentration camp prisoners killed in production.

There's also A BBC News Magazine article stating that 9000 number directly. It mentions a mountain-factory in Germany that had 60,000 slave laborers - making the "forced laborer" death toll at least plausible, given how the Nazis were running things. It also notes that the V2 would have been much more effective if it had not been shut down so thoroughly by allied bombing.

Finally, the Daily Mail website states both numbers directly... for what that's worth. They may just be following along with the oft-referenced BBC numbers, but they have a number of other statistics that are not so broadly spread, so possibly not.

I do not have an answer to the other, and I'm not convinced that it is answerable if true. Proving a negative is really very difficult at the best of times, and proving a negative in a matter of historical footnote is much moreso. It also somewhat depends on your definition of "weapon" - specifically in how distinct it has to be in order to not just get grouped in with other weapons of the same type. If a very specific make and model of cannon had some horrible laboratory accident, only produced one instance, and then had that instance spiked after being fired but without managing to do much damage, I can totally imagine that it would fit the answer... but I doubt it would be easy to find.

Tools of War: History of Weapons in Modern Times by Syed Ramsey claims that there was a 2011 BBC documentary stating numbers of 9000 killed in attacks, with 12000 forced laborers and concentration camp prisoners killed in production.

There's also A BBC News Magazine article stating that 9000 number directly. It mentions a mountain-factory in Germany that had 60,000 slave laborers - making the "forced laborer" death toll at least plausible, given how the Nazis were running things. It also notes that the V2 would have been much more effective if it had not been shut down so thoroughly by allied bombing.

I do not have an answer to the other, and I'm not convinced that it is answerable if true. Proving a negative is really very difficult at the best of times, and proving a negative in a matter of historical footnote is much moreso. It also somewhat depends on your definition of "weapon" - specifically in how distinct it has to be in order to not just get grouped in with other weapons of the same type. If a very specific make and model of cannon had some horrible laboratory accident, only produced one instance, and then had that instance spiked after being fired but without managing to do much damage, I can totally imagine that it would fit the answer... but I doubt it would be easy to find.

Tools of War: History of Weapons in Modern Times by Syed Ramsey claims that there was a 2011 BBC documentary stating numbers of 9000 killed in attacks, with 12000 forced laborers and concentration camp prisoners killed in production.

There's also A BBC News Magazine article stating that 9000 number directly. It mentions a mountain-factory in Germany that had 60,000 slave laborers - making the "forced laborer" death toll at least plausible, given how the Nazis were running things. It also notes that the V2 would have been much more effective if it had not been shut down so thoroughly by allied bombing.

Finally, the Daily Mail website states both numbers directly... for what that's worth. They may just be following along with the oft-referenced BBC numbers, but they have a number of other statistics that are not so broadly spread, so possibly not.

I do not have an answer to the other, and I'm not convinced that it is answerable if true. Proving a negative is really very difficult at the best of times, and proving a negative in a matter of historical footnote is much moreso. It also somewhat depends on your definition of "weapon" - specifically in how distinct it has to be in order to not just get grouped in with other weapons of the same type. If a very specific make and model of cannon had some horrible laboratory accident, only produced one instance, and then had that instance spiked after being fired but without managing to do much damage, I can totally imagine that it would fit the answer... but I doubt it would be easy to find.

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Tools of War: History of Weapons in Modern Times by Syed Ramsey claims that there was a 2011 BBC documentary stating numbers of 9000 killed in attacks, with 12000 forced laborers and concentration camp prisoners killed in production.

There's also A BBC News Magazine article stating that 9000 number directly. It mentions a mountain-factory in Germany that had 60,000 slave laborers - making the "forced laborer" death toll at least plausible, given how the Nazis were running things. It also notes that the V2 would have been much more effective if it had not been shut down so thoroughly by allied bombing.

I do not have an answer to the other, and I'm not convinced that it is answerable if true. Proving a negative is really very difficult at the best of times, and proving a negative in a matter of historical footnote is much moreso. It also somewhat depends on your definition of "weapon" - specifically in how distinct it has to be in order to not just get grouped in with other weapons of the same type. If a very specific make and model of cannon had some horrible laboratory accident, only produced one instance, and then had that instance spiked after being fired but without managing to do much damage, I can totally imagine that it would fit the answer... but I doubt it would be easy to find.